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Review: Aorus GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Xtreme Edition

by Tarinder Sandhu on 7 April 2017, 15:01

Tags: AORUS, Gigabyte (TPE:2376)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qadf2n

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Conclusion

Hitting many of the right notes - it's fast, relatively cool and quiet - our only slight issue is price.

Those after a truly premium experience need look no further than the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti. Pushed closer to the limit by partners who use a heavy-duty approach to cooling, getting in excess of 60 frames per second at a 4K resolution is now a reasonable aim.

Aorus feels as if the Ti variant is ripe for an Xtreme makoever. Ostensibly using the same cooling as on the GTX 1080 we looked at recently, the card is a mix of beauty and the beast. All lit up and paired with a Gigabyte Aorus motherboard it can serve as a visual treat, but it's designed for big chassis that can readily accommodate its size.

Performance is, as expected, excellent, and it falls into step with other partner-overclocked cards. Hitting many of the right notes - it's fast, relatively cool and quiet - our only slight issue is price. At £800 for this particular model it's more than the Inno3D that's a tad faster in our benchmarks.

And taking a little shine off the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti is the very recent launch of the Titan Xp, featuring the full complement of 3,840 shaders and 384-bit memory bandwidth present on the GP102 die. As fast as the GTX 1080 Ti is, it is no longer king of the hill.

Bottom line: the Aorus GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Xtreme Edition is intrinsically a very capable gaming card that's priced at premium levels.

The Good
 
The Bad
Cooler, quieter and faster than reference
250W TDP
Lights up like a Christmas tree
Beefy construction
Four-year warranty
Massive framebuffer
 
Titan Xp now the fastest card in town



Aorus GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Xtreme Edition

HEXUS.where2buy*

The Aorus GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Xtreme Edition graphics card is available to purchase from Scan Computers.

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At HEXUS, we invite the companies whose products we test to comment on our articles. If any company representatives for the products reviewed choose to respond, we'll publish their commentary here verbatim.



*UK-based HEXUS community members are eligible for free delivery and priority customer service through the SCAN.care@HEXUS forum.



HEXUS Forums :: 15 Comments

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I'd rather sacrifice a bit of space and cooling potential to have all that heat exhausted from the case.
I just couldnt stop looking at that lil fan in the center… looks so cute xD
CAPTAIN_ALLCAPS
I'd rather sacrifice a bit of space and cooling potential to have all that heat exhausted from the case.
Surely a decent case with a 140mm or even better 200mm exhaust fan would move the heat out quickly? This massive open-air cooler is only likely to be a problem when going dual card.

The DVI ports blocks a lot of the potential exhaust too, surely a DP<>DVI adapter would have been a better choice.
kompukare
Surely a decent case with a 140mm or even better 200mm exhaust fan would move the heat out quickly? This massive open-air cooler is only likely to be a problem when going dual card.

The DVI ports blocks a lot of the potential exhaust too, surely a DP<>DVI adapter would have been a better choice.

That is adding more fans and therefore more noise, though. Plus not many cases have room at the back for a 200mm exhaust.
CAPTAIN_ALLCAPS
I'd rather sacrifice a bit of space and cooling potential to have all that heat exhausted from the case.
Why? The reference designs have been overheating and thus throttling in all kinds of reviews. They're also really noisy because the fan is running so fast. That extra 5-10 degrees C isn't going to bother your other components at all.