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Corsair to launch 3GHz Dominator Platinum DDR3 memory

by Parm Mann on 31 May 2012, 16:47

Tags: Corsair

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qabhif

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Corsair's premium Dominator memory has taken a back seat in recent years while the wallet-friendly Vengeance range has hogged the limelight.

But while Vengeance has served the mainstream well, those of you who insist on paying top-dollar for each and every component have probably been holding out for this; Corsair's the new top-of-the-line Dominator Platinum.

Soon to be available in an array of dual- and quad-channel kits at speeds of up to 3,000MHz, this premium range will target overclocking aficionados looking to make a statement.

If you're prepared to pony up the cash - and we suspect you'll need plenty of it - you'll be getting hand-screened ICs just dying to be pushed to the limit, Corsair's patented DHX heat spreader (with fins), a custom PCB with copper thermal pads, stainless steel bodywork and a 'polished aluminium light bar' that illuminates over the top to provide that extra bit of bling.

There's also built-in support for Corsair Link connectivity - allowing you to keep a close eye on temperature - and we're told the Dominator Platinum kits will launch in 'limited quantities,' so you may want to start saving the pennies to ensure you're first in line.

High-speed RAM may offer little real-world benefit on today's latest Intel platforms, but the Platinum heatspreaders sure do look the business.


[Update] A range of Corsair Dominator Platinum memory kits are now available to pre-order from Scan Computers*.



*UK-based HEXUS community members are eligible for free delivery and priority customer service through the SCAN.care@HEXUS forum.



HEXUS Forums :: 12 Comments

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“High-speed RAM may offer little real-world benefit over a cheaper solution”

Unless you're planning on using an APU with sufficiently powerful graphics that they get badwidth starved. Like, say, trinity ;) Given Llano showed significant performance gains right through to 1833MHz, and Trinity's IGP should gain ~20% performance through architecture enhancements (based on 5870 - 6970 comparison), and runs ~ 80% faster in clock terms, I'd say that “as fast as you can afford” should be the recommendation on buying memory for Trinity…
scaryjim
“High-speed RAM may offer little real-world benefit over a cheaper solution”

Unless you're planning on using an APU with sufficiently powerful graphics that they get badwidth starved. Like, say, trinity ;) Given Llano showed significant performance gains right through to 1833MHz, and Trinity's IGP should gain ~20% performance through architecture enhancements (based on 5870 - 6970 comparison), and runs ~ 80% faster in clock terms, I'd say that “as fast as you can afford” should be the recommendation on buying memory for Trinity…

Or get cheap RAM and a discrete card?
theres £7 difference between 1600 and 1866 ram on scan….
scaryjim
“High-speed RAM may offer little real-world benefit over a cheaper solution”

Unless you're planning on using an APU with sufficiently powerful graphics that they get badwidth starved. Like, say, trinity ;) Given Llano showed significant performance gains right through to 1833MHz, and Trinity's IGP should gain ~20% performance through architecture enhancements (based on 5870 - 6970 comparison), and runs ~ 80% faster in clock terms, I'd say that “as fast as you can afford” should be the recommendation on buying memory for Trinity…

They did say on the latest Intel platforms, which is reasonably true. Agree with you for Trinity though.
HalloweenJack
theres £7 difference between 1600 and 1866 ram on scan….

This is 3 GHz RAM. I ssupect there will be a lot more than a £7 difference between 1600 MHz RAM and this stuff ;)