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Alienware 55 OLED Gaming Monitor launched at Gamescom

by Mark Tyson on 20 August 2019, 13:30

Tags: Dell (NASDAQ:DELL), Alienware (NASDAQ:DELL)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaecxy

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Alienware and Dell are at Gamescom with a bevy of gaming hardware. Alienware is celebrating its 10th anniversary and has a new mid-tower, monitors, keyboards, and mice to show off. Meanwhile, Dell has introduced the first G series Dell G5 desktop, as well as a new 32-inch curved gaming monitor.

Alienware highlights

A trio of Alienware gaming monitors featuring the firm's latest Legend industrial design are catching eyes at Gamescom. At the top of the pile is the new Alienware 55 OLED Gaming Monitor AW5520QF. As per the name this is a 55-inch OLED monitor, with "incredible colour accuracy and depth with 98.5 per cent DCI-P3 colour coverage". For gaming chops this 4K screen offers a max 120Hz refresh rate and is AMD FreeSync friendly. Furthermore, Alienware says it offers a response time of 0.5ms (grey-to-grey), and low input latency.

Other niceties and frills added to this premium OLED gaming monitor are; AlienFX lighting, gaming-centric on-screen display (OSD), built-in speakers are tuned with Waves MaxxAudio, VESA mount adaptor, and a remote control. The AW5520QF will become available in the US from 30th Sept starting at $3,999.

Alienware is also showing off a 34-inch curved gaming monitor AW3420DW. This has a 1900R curved, wide 21:9 WQHD-resolution IPS screen. Alienware says the IPS Nano Colour technology provides 98 per cent DCI-P3 colour coverage, along with a 120Hz (native) refresh rate and Nvidia G-Sync display technology. Again featuring AlienFX lighting with four customizable zones, gaming-centric on-screen-display and height-adjustable stand, this gaming monitor is set to become available from 28th Aug and priced at $1,499.

The third Alienware monitor launched at Gamescom is the fastest yet. The Alienware 27 Gaming Monitor AW2720HF is "all about speed," we are told. It features a fast IPS technology 240Hz refresh rate and true 1ms response time (grey-to-grey) panel in Extreme mode, with AMD Radeon FreeSync technology.

Alienware was also keen to highlight the first Legend industrial design Alienware Aurora mid-tower gaming PC. This powerhouse pre-built can be configured with the latest Intel 9th Gen Core Processors and Nvidia GeForce graphic cards. You can buy this Aurora design gaming desktop from today onwards starting at $969.99.

Legend industrial design peripherals / accessories are on show at Gamescom too. A double dose of mechanical keyboards and triple shot of mice provides numerous input peripheral permutations in this new style.

Dell highlights

Dell launched this first G series Dell G5 desktop at Gamescom. These are designed to offer game-ready power, graphics and features in a compact, upgradeable form. Buyers can spec up to Intel Core i9 K-Series CPUs and VR-capable Nvidia GeForce GTX and RTX or AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 graphic cards.

These desktops feature tool-less entry with free drive bays and expansion slots available. Four thermal modes are possible and are set in the Alienware Command Centre - suggested profiles for gaming, working, studying or watching videos. Dell says the G5 desktops are surprisingly compact to easily fit into minimal space but can be made into a presence with optional blue LED lighting and glass side panels. Available from today, the Dell G5 gaming desktops are priced from $629.

Dell has a new gaming monitor too. The Dell 32 Curved Gaming Monitor S3220DGF uses a 32-inch curved 1800R screen with QHD resolution. In terms of performance, gamers can expect up to a 165Hz refresh and the screen uses AMD Radeon FreeSync 2 HDR technology for smooth visuals. The S3220DGF is VESA DisplayHDR 400 certified and provides more than 90 per cent DCI-P3 colour coverage. Available from 28th Aug, this 32-inch gaming monitor will be priced from $599.99.



HEXUS Forums :: 7 Comments

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At these sizes, it should just be called what it is clearly aimed at being (especially with it being tagged as “gaming”) - a TV.

Sure, without the tuners it is technically correct to call them monitors, but in practical terms screens sized 32“ and above are generally used as TVs for home users.

There are so many so-called monitors with newer tech at stupidly large sizes, yet the sizes that they would be most desirable at for monitor usage, such as 22” to 24", there seems to be a distinct lack of them - and even when you do find them, the stupidly large sized versions are usually still cheaper.
Output
At these sizes, it should just be called what it is clearly aimed at being (especially with it being tagged as “gaming”) - a TV.

Sure, without the tuners it is technically correct to call them monitors, but in practical terms screens sized 32“ and above are generally used as TVs for home users.

There are so many so-called monitors with newer tech at stupidly large sizes, yet the sizes that they would be most desirable at for monitor usage, such as 22” to 24", there seems to be a distinct lack of them - and even when you do find them, the stupidly large sized versions are usually still cheaper.

Thanless you're this guy https://dailypicdump.com/media/20160328/cool-tv-grandfather-playing-games-computer.jpg

They're TV sized but the specs are more in line with what you get from a monitor than TV. Isn't anyone else worried about burn-in? Especially if used as a monitor with a lot of static elements on screen.
chj
Thanless you're this guy https://dailypicdump.com/media/20160328/cool-tv-grandfather-playing-games-computer.jpg
True, but it's clearly not really practical to try to use such a large screen in those circumstances.

chj
They're TV sized but the specs are more in line with what you get from a monitor than TV. Isn't anyone else worried about burn-in? Especially if used as a monitor with a lot of static elements on screen.

My point remains though, they keep producing them at the very large sizes, yet the more practical sizes don't seem to be getting a look-in.

I would have thought that burn-in prevention had been figured out by now though, given the static elements regularly present when various sports are shown on TV, as well as any channel logos that some channels may like to include on all of their broadcasts.
Output
My point remains though, they keep producing them at the very large sizes, yet the more practical sizes don't seem to be getting a look-in.


The only manufacturer producing OLED panels, bigger than those for Phones and tablets, is LG and they start at 55". Others plan to start production but, are some way off bringing panels to market and until they do, I suspect LG will continue to concentrate on the higher margin big panels. Most interesting is Samsung as they are developing micro-led panels without the organic compounds used in OLEDs, which should address OLED's weaknesses.
Got all excited by their new ultrawide for a moment, until you realise it's still not an HDR panel :( Really want to make the leap and was hoping they would make a new version of the AW3418DW with HDR and with the panel OC'd to 200, like LG et al have done this year.

Sadly we just got a base refresh, which is a bit of a shame - very little reason to pick one up over the AW3418DW which can be had for 750-850£ depending on the day at the moment. I know that HDR400 is a total waste of time, but seems a missed opportunity for them not to even push for that.

Maybe next year eh! At least waiting a year means we might see a more sensible price point given the LG one I mention is over £2100 :) :)