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Lenovo launches the world’s lightest 14-inch OLED laptop

by Mark Tyson on 8 September 2021, 12:11

Tags: Lenovo (HKG:0992)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaeq3z

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Lenovo has a whole host of PC tech announcements today, as part of its 7th annual global technology event – Tech World 2021. At the bottom of this post you will find links to read more about all the announcements, as well as Euro pricing for the devices coming to the UK (not sure why to £s), as shared by Lenovo in an email to HEXUS. Lenovo has launched a multitude of devices including tablets, monitors, a Chromebook, and a couple of Yoga devices. I am going to focus on the latter – particularly the Lenovo Yoga Slim 7 Carbon – which Lenovo claims to be "the world's lightest 14-inch OLED laptop".

The creation of the Lenovo Yoga Slim 7 Carbon is said to be inspired by the world's shift towards a hybrid lifestyle – delivering speed when you need it, with eminent portability, in a premium package. In summary here you have a sleek and well crafted laptop, with an attractive OLED display, with powerful mobile processors – up to an 8-core AMD Ryzen 7 5800U Series Mobile Processors with AMD Radeon Graphics (Vega 8), with an added choice of optional Nvidia GeForce MX450 graphics. Notebook Check comparisons suggest that Vega 8 isn't always an inferior choice to MX450, so it doesn't look like it would be worth paying extra for the Nvidia GPU option.

The portability of this OLED screen packing laptop is its headlining quality, and it does indeed seem to excel in this respect. The Lenovo Yoga Slim 7 Carbon weighs just 1.1kg (2.37 lbs), and measures under 15mm thick on the thinner side of the wedge shape. Light weight and strength come from the choice of carbon fibre and magnesium alloy, which is finished in a nicely neutral cloud grey hue. The finished product has passed MIL-STD 810H standard tests.

Lenovo says the 14-inch OLED display it used is made by Samsung. It features four narrow bezels, and is pretty sharp with its 16:20 format QHD+ resolution. Colour performance and similar metrics look good, with the display said to offer 100 percent DCI-P3 colour gamut, factory calibration to Delta E <2, support for Dolby Vision, and a VESA DisplayHDR TrueBlack 500 certification. Moreover, the 600 nits peak brightness, and 90Hz refresh rate, with TÜV Eye Comfort certification, are attractions of this Gorilla Glass coated display which are hard to ignore.

Other specs you might like to know about are the: up to 16GB of LPDDR4X memory, up to 1TB of PCIe SSD storage, 61Whr battery (14.5 hours stamina) with fast charging (15 mins for 3 hours use), AI cooling tech, four front facing Dolby Atmos speakers, Alexa Show mode, Wi-Fi 6, IR sensor and ToF sensor, Windows 11.

The Lenovo Yoga Slim 7 Carbon will become available starting from October.

Lenovo's consumer portfolio announced in the UK:

  • Yoga Slim 7 Carbon €1199 (incl. VAT)
  • Yoga Slim 7 Pro €1299 (incl. VAT)
  • IdeaPad Duet 5 Chromebook €499 (including VAT)
  • Lenovo Tab P12 Pro (WiFi) €899
  • Lenovo Tab P12 Pro (5G) €899
  • Lenovo Tab P11 5G €499
  • Lenovo G27e-20 Monitor €299 (incl. VAT)
  • Lenovo G24e-20 Monitor €229 (incl. VAT)

Tech World 2021 links:



HEXUS Forums :: 16 Comments

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£1200 is a price I'd pay for a laptop lasting 7-10 years. I've done this twice now. But the big question for a long term purchase is that OLED screen. It's a selling point but I need to know burn in has been resolved and is warrantied if it does happpen.
LPDDR4X means soldered RAM, so by they time the screen gets totally burnt-in the machine probably has no little RAM to run anything!
philehidiot
£1200 is a price I'd pay for a laptop lasting 7-10 years. I've done this twice now. But the big question for a long term purchase is that OLED screen. It's a selling point but I need to know burn in has been resolved and is warrantied if it does happpen.
That's exactly my issue. Or rathdr, almost exactly. It's more than the screen for me. I've been looking at an Asus G15 (32GB, 3080 version) but …. I am looking for a system to last like 7-10 years and at more like £2500, there's a LOT in such a laptop that can die and render it either junk, or expremely expensive to repair. The G15 isn't quite as bad as a Razor Blade in that regard. but even with the G15, a lot is baked in. It makes me very nervous. Every time I make the decision to buy, I immediately think “Yeah, but what if …”. I don't need a laptop. It'd be mainly about convenience, and availability, especially of 30xx GPU (*) bits.




(*) Yes, I know many (or virtually all) laptop 30xx GPUs are power-limited and not offering the same graphical grunt as desktop variants. The G15 3080 has a max of about 100w draw, which is way under a full-blooded desktop 3080. Less than half, IIRC.
philehidiot
£1200 is a price I'd pay for a laptop lasting 7-10 years. I've done this twice now. But the big question for a long term purchase is that OLED screen. It's a selling point but I need to know burn in has been resolved and is warrantied if it does happen.
In 7 - 10 years EVERYTHING in this laptop will be next to useless. For $1200 it isn't a bad buy, if you don't want to play AAA games. Always remember…the next new, must-have tech, is only ever 6 months away. That way there can never be buyers remorse. Get what you can TODAY.
ohmaheid
In 7 - 10 years EVERYTHING in this laptop will be next to useless. For $1200 it isn't a bad buy, if you don't want to play AAA games. Always remember…the next new, must-have tech, is only ever 6 months away. That way there can never be buyers remorse. Get what you can TODAY.
Depends on the buyer's circumstances, and wants/needs. For me, nothing that will happen in the next 6 months, or for that matter 36 months, is “must have”. It might be “want”, or even “badly want” but not “need”. Any PC that does what I want today will do what I actually need in several years time. Also, not having to go through the faff of buying again several times in the next decade is pretty high on my priority list.

To me, a PC is a tool to do a job. Anything that'll do9 today's job will do mit acceptably for several years, at least. Gaming? Yup, if the PC will do it I will do some but it isn't what I buy a PC to do. Hence the above position.