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Asus ProArt StudioBook One is "world's fastest laptop": Nvidia

by Mark Tyson on 5 September 2019, 11:21

Tags: ASUSTeK (TPE:2357), NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA)

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Asus is another big company showing off all sorts of new tech goodies at IFA 2019. If you watch the Asus Wiser Together presentation or check out its dedicated IFA 2019 pages you will see that the firm has focussed upon 'creator' style offerings at this event, but it has covered other bases too. For example, there are four new products headlining the ProArt range, a couple of new ZenBooks, the ROG Phone II Ultimate edition and more.

Above, a condensed version of Asus' IFA 2019 presentation

Probably the biggest draw of the show was the Asus ProArt StudioBook One, which Nvidia describes as the "world's fastest laptop," in a blog post of its own from IFA. This laptop is the first to feature Nvidia's new Quadro RTX 6000 graphics and is powered by the latest 9th Generation Intel Core i9 processors.

Highlights of the Quadro RTX 6000 graphics in the Asus ProArt StudioBook One are that it features 24GB of ultra-fast GPU memory to tackle large scenes, models, datasets and complex multi-app workflows, and it leverages Nvidia's latest Turing architecture including RT Cores and Tensor Cores.

As a mobile workstation the ProArt StudioBook One has an innovative cooling solution with ultra-thin titanium vapour chambers and can switch to Intel iGPU when undertaking less demanding tasks (Nvidia Optimus). Other important ingredients of the new premium creator laptop are its professional 4K 120Hz Pantone validated display with 100 per cent Adobe RGB colour coverage, unprecedented colour accuracy, and factory calibration for stunning visuals out-of-the-box, and the slim 300W high-density, high-efficiency power adapter provides charging and power at half the size of traditional 300W power adapters.

In addition to the above, Asus launched the ProArt StudioBook Pro X as the first Quadro laptop to feature the four-sided Asus NanoEdge display. The design makes for a 92 per cent screen-to-body ratio and 16:10 aspect ratio with wide colour gamut and 97 per cent DCI-P3 colour space coverage. Inside this laptop you can spec up to a 9th Generation Intel Xeon or Intel Core i7 hexa-core processor and professional-grade Nvidia Quadro RTX 5000 graphics.

If you are interested in a pre-built workstation desktop PC, Asus was showing off the ProArt Station D940MX. This is a compact design (8 litre) for content creators and media professionals. It keeps things compact by utilising a dual-sided logic board and can be specced with up to an Intel Core i9 processor with up to 64GB DDR4 2666MHz memory, and Nvidia Quadro RTX 4000 or NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti graphics, dual storage (PCIe plus SATA), plus fornt panel Thunderbolt 3 ports.

Last but not least among the new ProArt goodies was the Asus ProArt Display PA32UCG. This is a 32-inch, 4K HDR, Mini LED Backlight / IPS, 1,152 zones local dimming monitor. It supports multiple HDR formats (Dolby Vision, HDR-10, HLG) and true 10-bit colour with Quantum-dot technology for exceptional colour fidelity. It is provided calibrated and offers ∆E < 1 colour performance.

Game developers might appreciate the 48~120 Hz Variable-refresh-rate (VRR) tech, allowing for both content creation and quality check on the one display. Connectivity is provided by dual Thunderbolt 3, one DisplayPort, three HDMI ports, and a built-in USB hub.



HEXUS Forums :: 4 Comments

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I want to hear how fast those coolers move!
Tabbykatze
I want to hear how fast those coolers move!

Back in the day, I had a similar breed of laptop system with silly everything and weighed a tonne. Typically, even though at the time the Athlon64 was far better, you could only get such systems with Intel CPUs and it had a desktop P4. In a laptop chassis. And a discreet GPU. And I think two HDDs. Also had a top of the range display which was still kinda meh compared to the desktop stuff but was awesome for the time.

I seem to remember it had around 6 fans and a massive heat pipe system. The side vent was chucking out 50 degrees C heat and the palm rest areas were so hot I struggled to keep my hands there and ended up with heat rash.

At the time, it was utterly awesome as I could do anything anywhere and I was moving around all over the place. The sheer weight was insane (along with the PSU) but CS:S anywhere with amazing frame rates and proper desktop chooch and a tonne of RAM in a laptop was brilliant.
1) a Ti alloy cooling system is an odd choice, there's good reason Ti isn't usually used in cooling systems - the thermal conductivity is about the same as stainless steel (i.e. really bad), and for alloys it's even worse
2) Motherboard behind the screen is an unusual setup
3) a 300 W charging brick???
Xlucine
1) a Ti alloy cooling system is an odd choice, there's good reason Ti isn't usually used in cooling systems - the thermal conductivity is about the same as stainless steel (i.e. really bad), and for alloys it's even worse
2) Motherboard behind the screen is an unusual setup
3) a 300 W charging brick???

The mobo choice is strange and vulnerable. One of my tests for a new laptop is pushing on the back of the screen to see if any bumps will be transmitted into the panel and they almost always are. The only ones that passed that test back when I was looking was an Asus netbook and the Macbook Air. The casings are usually very flimsy and I'd not want my mobo there at all.

Titanium has probably been used because it's lighter and they can market it. Marketing > engineering - just ask Dyson.

300W charging makes sense if you've got an Intel processor which can boost way above the stated TDP, discrete graphics and then on top of that you've got to charge it. 300W seems a little low, really.