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Synology starts to ship the DiskStation DS414slim

by Mark Tyson on 27 May 2014, 13:11

Tags: Synology

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Synology has emailed HEXUS today to tell us about the global launch and availability of the DiskStation DS414slim. The successor to the popular DS411slim, the DS414slim features a new processor, more memory, greater storage capacity and more and faster interfaces. Notably the new model is much improved in its media streaming performance. Check out a comparison table here, if you are interested in old-vs-new.

The DiskStation DS414slim is built to accept 2.5-inch form factor HDD/SSD drives. It can accept up to four such devices with a maximum capacity of 6TB in total (1.5TB HDD x 4). That's an improvement upon the previous DS411slim model's 4TB maximum capacity. The DS414slim is only 120 x 105 x 142 mm and weighs in at 0.66Kg unpopulated.

Other improvements to this slim NAS include a new processor; the Marvell Armada 370 which runs at 1.2GHz. This SoC utilises an ARMv7 core and an FPU. It is purpose built for devices such as NAS, with lots of I/O possibilities. The 512MB of RAM is also double what was installed in its predecessor. Synology says that this component combination "guarantees the optimum experience of intensive applications". Looking at the comparison with its predecessor it certainly seems a lot better at movie streaming.

The performance figures in Windows show the DS414slim delivers average read and write speeds of 110.91MB/s and 54.53MB/s respectively. Connectivity is via dual Gigabit LAN ports and two USB 3.0 ports. Drives are said to be snap-in hot swappable for convenience. The DS414slim consumes just 15.48 watts in accessing mode. Power use can be reduced by utilising the Wake on LAN/WAN and Scheduled Power on/off features. We are told that the Synology DS414slim can run cool 24/7. A new easy-to-replace 60mm fan with smart airflow is installed to help prevent any heat problems.

Wrapping up the offering and as you might expect, the DS414slim runs Synology's award winning DiskStation Manager 5.0 operating system software. It's able to provide seamless file sharing across Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms. Furthermore CloudStation allows file sync between Windows PC, Mac, Linux, iOS and Android tablets or phones. Another utility, CloudSync, provides syncs your Dropbox, Google Drive and Baidu storage with the personal cloud provided by the DiskStation software.

As mentioned in the headline the DS414slim is available now, however I couldn't find a live listing for the device at the time of writing.



HEXUS Forums :: 5 Comments

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I have a couple guys who are going to move in with me for a couple months soon and we all want to get something set up like a NAS. But with 3 people potentially accessing and streaming 1080p content at the same time I'm just not sure if something like this would be appropriate. We are debating throwing together a cheap box together with a AMD quadcore and just load that up with hard drives and bang on some open source OS. Any words of wisdom from people?
Jowsey
I have a couple guys who are going to move in with me for a couple months soon and we all want to get something set up like a NAS. But with 3 people potentially accessing and streaming 1080p content at the same time I'm just not sure if something like this would be appropriate. We are debating throwing together a cheap box together with a AMD quadcore and just load that up with hard drives and bang on some open source OS. Any words of wisdom from people?
Based on my (very limited) NAS use, the big plus for building your own box is that you can load the sucker with network cards and especially drives. Problem with streaming multiple files is that you need a good wide network pipe and, especially, decent storage bandwidth. Ideal for the latter (based on research) seems to be a RAID5/6/etc array of SSD's. Trouble with that is the usual SSD tradeoff of capacity v's speed.

For media centre use though an SSD is heaven sent - no head to move to slow streaming speeds, no tick tick tick noises when it's reading and low power consumption. And last time I checked you can get about 600GB of SSD (using 6x120GB drives) for about £300.

Good thing about this box is that you just buy the box, slap in 4 240GB SSD's (£330 worth) and you've got a 720GB media centre - nice. Make sure it's hooked up to a Gigabit link and you might be in business - minimum hassle.
crossy
Jowsey
I have a couple guys who are going to move in with me for a couple months soon and we all want to get something set up like a NAS. But with 3 people potentially accessing and streaming 1080p content at the same time I'm just not sure if something like this would be appropriate. We are debating throwing together a cheap box together with a AMD quadcore and just load that up with hard drives and bang on some open source OS. Any words of wisdom from people?
Based on my (very limited) NAS use, the big plus for building your own box is that you can load the sucker with network cards and especially drives. Problem with streaming multiple files is that you need a good wide network pipe and, especially, decent storage bandwidth. Ideal for the latter (based on research) seems to be a RAID5/6/etc array of SSD's. Trouble with that is the usual SSD tradeoff of capacity v's speed.

For media centre use though an SSD is heaven sent - no head to move to slow streaming speeds, no tick tick tick noises when it's reading and low power consumption. And last time I checked you can get about 600GB of SSD (using 6x120GB drives) for about £300.

Good thing about this box is that you just buy the box, slap in 4 240GB SSD's (£330 worth) and you've got a 720GB media centre - nice. Make sure it's hooked up to a Gigabit link and you might be in business - minimum hassle.

All bedrooms are hooked up with Gigabit ethernet and media pc will be hooked up via powerline.

NAS will be stored on top of my wardrobe and connected via ethernet (in this case it would be both LAN ports). For 3 guys who have large DVD and bluray collections that will be ripped and stored on the server ( plus ancillary water based downloading…)

My personal computer has a 2 tb hard drive 80% full so we would be looking for atleast 4-6 tb of storage (just looked and this NAS only supports 1.5tb drives so maybe this particular NAS isn't appropriate for me)

Thanks for the advice bud.
Jowsey
All bedrooms are hooked up with Gigabit ethernet and media pc will be hooked up via powerline. NAS will be stored on top of my wardrobe and connected via ethernet (in this case it would be both LAN ports).
Same setup as I have/had. One thing I will say though - based on experience you might be better to see if the NAS can be plugged into router directly if you can. Media PC likewise - although I'd be very careful who's PLE units you use. I just got a pair of Devolo's “650+” spec ones and to be brutal I don't see much change over the “AV+” I had before - other than the 650's are recognised as Gigabit, whereas the AV+'s are only Fast Ether. Replaced ALL my PLE's with Devolo AV spec gear a while ago and haven't had any problems - they run cool and reliable. Use an AV Wireless+ in the bedroom to give me 3 network ports (PC and XBox) plus 802.11n wireless for tablets - and that's good enough to be able to stream 5oD programmes to my Note 10.1 tablet. And these are the old (200Mb/s) AV+'s rather than the newer 500Mb/s gear.
Jowsey
My personal computer has a 2 tb hard drive 80% full so we would be looking for atleast 4-6 tb of storage (just looked and this NAS only supports 1.5tb drives so maybe this particular NAS isn't appropriate for me)
Not sure if you're interested, but Aria sent me a newsletter yesterday - they're selling the 4TB WD Red's for £113 inc VAT. Cheap 4-way NAS and 4 of these in a RAID 0+1 setup? 8TB of mirrored storage for £400 and change - nice!
Jowsey
Thanks for the advice bud.
You are definitely welcome - wish I could've done more.
I bet this will be more expensive than an NL54 for a long time and I'll bet you can't stick 16GB of ECC RAM in it and use zfs or RAIDz.