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Intel Xe DG1 graphics card doesn't shine in 3DMark Fire Strike

by Mark Tyson on 1 June 2020, 14:11

Tags: Intel (NASDAQ:INTC), AMD (NYSE:AMD), NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA)

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The Intel Xe DG1 graphics card isn't intended for consumers. Rather it is a Software Development Vehicle, designed to allow developers to test apps and optimise for Intel's upcoming Xe graphics - which will debut for consumers in Tiger Lake (TGL) processors. Nevertheless, it is still interesting to see benchmarks for this component, as it will give some indications of the strength of integrated graphics we can hope for in future slim and light Intel-powered laptops.

It is thought that the Xe DG1 packs 96 Execution Units (768 cores), and is paired with 3GB or 6GB of GDDR6 memory. It doesn't have a power connector so will be drawing its <75W from the PCIe slot.

Last month we got to see some indicative performance for the Intel Xe DG1 graphics card, uncovered by Tum Apisak, rifling around the Geekbench databases. Comparisons made it look OK vs rival integrated offerings, but weak compared to entry-level discrete GPUs.

At the weekend Apisak struck again, claiming to have unearthed a 3DMark Fire Strike run on a system packing a DG1 (and Core i9-9900K processor). The score of 5538 was on a par with a GPU like the GeForce GTX 1050. That makes it possibly a good choice for combating AMD APUs, and helping Intel partners to phase out the reliance on the Nvidia MX series GPUs where some extra pep is required. This will depend on the power consumption figures too.

3DMark Fire Strike scores that are similar to that of the Xe DG1 include those from systems packing the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050, or the AMD Radeon RX 560. However, contemporary Nvidia and AMD GPUs like the GeForce GTX 1650 and Radeon RX 5500M provide a big step up, delivering approx 30 per cent and 130 per cent performance uplifts, respectively.

Another article we published recently compared Tiger Lake iGPU performance with Ice Lake iGPUs across several power budgets in 3DMark Fire Strike. This shows that Intel will be providing pretty impressive performance gains in iGPU terms. Additionally, Intel promised that TGL CPUs will provide "double digit CPU performance gains," compared to Ice Lake.



HEXUS Forums :: 17 Comments

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Gotta start somewhere - nobody could reasonably expect competitive performance straight out of the gate.

A viable third option in the GPU stakes will be a breath of fresh air.

We just need Nvidia to start producing desktop CPUs now…
Spreadie
Gotta start somewhere - nobody could reasonably expect competitive performance straight out of the gate.

Considering the size of their R&D budget and the talent they hired/poached, I don't think its unreasonable at all to expect something, especially given all the waffle from said poached talent.

I wouldn't expect Halo card beating, but this is below meh.
Am I right in thinking that this going to be the iGPU in 15/28W Tiger Lake chips and isn't meant to be a discrete GPU, just happens to be packaged that way?

If so, it's pretty impressive - it's has 768 cores, so has the firepower of a 1050, which is handily matches.

Scaled up to 3000+ cores on a discrete GPU and we might yet see something to rival the Green and Red teams' equivalent offerings.
SylvanSagacious
Considering the size of their R&D budget and the talent they hired/poached, I don't think its unreasonable at all to expect something, especially given all the waffle from said poached talent.

I wouldn't expect Halo card beating, but this is below meh.

I'm not denying that it's sub-par but, unless they ditch it like Laffabee, they'll only move forwards. I'm looking forward to the long game.
rwh202
Am I right in thinking that this going to be the iGPU in 15/28W Tiger Lake chips and isn't meant to be a discrete GPU, just happens to be packaged that way?

If so, it's pretty impressive - it's has 768 cores, so has the firepower of a 1050, which is handily matches.

Assuming the card is actually running in a suitably limited power envelope, assuming dedicated VRAM doesn't affect performance, and assuming Fire Strike performance is actually indicative of game performance.