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Razer Phone converts to laptop in Project Linda product concept

by Mark Tyson on 9 January 2018, 15:01

Tags: Razer

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qadpnj

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Razer has unveiled its Project Linda Android laptop / phone concept at the CES 2018. The 13.3-inch form factor clamshell laptop is powered by the Razer Phone, slotted in where a laptop touchpad would usually reside. From then on the dumb laptop shell springs to life as an Android laptop based around a Qualcomm Snapdragon 835 mobile platform and 8GB of RAM. While docked the Razer Phone display becomes the touch pad for interacting with the laptop or can be used as a second screen for various apps and software tools.

“Android power users and laptop enthusiasts share a need for performance in a mobile form factor, which we provide with our award-winning Razer Phone and Razer laptops,” said Razer co-founder and CEO Min-Liang Tan. “Project Linda combines the best of both worlds, bringing a larger screen and physical keyboard to the Android environment, enhancing the experience for gaming and productivity.”

A battery pack of 53.6Wh installed in the laptop shell can recharge the Razer Phone up to three times over while away from AC power. The laptop also includes 200GB of supplemental storage, a 3.5mm audio jack, a USB Type-A port, a USB Type-C charging port, a 720p webcam and a dual-array microphone.

The laptop shell boasts a CNC aluminium unibody chassis and is just 15mm thick when closed, weighing in at 1.25kg (including Razer Phone). Razer chose to equip the laptop with a 13.3-inch Quad HD touchscreen which extends the 120Hz experience available on the Razer Phone to a larger display. The keyboard features Razer Chroma backlighting.

Will Project Linda ever make it out as a finished product? You can register on the Razer site to receive updates and announcements related to the project.



HEXUS Forums :: 12 Comments

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Baffling. Either use the phone to power the laptop and basically have the laptop shell as a set of better HIDs, screen, inputs/outputs and battery or make the laptop more powerful than the phone by some margin and use it to charge the phone and access its data.

Why double up on hardware like this? It's nearly the same hardware as in the damned phone so why not just use that? Cooling might be an issue but a low speed fan sorts that very easily.

As for a second screen again it's just baffling. All you're gonna do is get palm prints all over your phone screen and be covering it with your hands most of the time anyway. Plus you'll have to look down at it at an awkward angle to view it, etc. I'm sure Apple will have tried this configuration and rejected it and they went for using gestures on a trackpad and a second screen right below the main screen. Probably for the reason that this is a cack idea.
Autoplaying video, closing tab.
I've forgotten how long this idea has been floating around for….it's been that long.
meh, there is no need for this in my life or anyone really.

If I lose my phone my laptops going to be gutted.

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philehidiot
Baffling. Either use the phone to power the laptop and basically have the laptop shell as a set of better HIDs, screen, inputs/outputs and battery or make the laptop more powerful than the phone by some margin and use it to charge the phone and access its data.

Why double up on hardware like this? It's nearly the same hardware as in the damned phone so why not just use that? Cooling might be an issue but a low speed fan sorts that very easily. …

Erm .. it doesn't double up the hardware. It's a dumb laptop shell that is powered by the phone. I thought that was pretty clear from the article, and it's confirmed by visiting the links in the article for more details….

I really like the lapdock idea and modern phones are more than powerful enough to use as a productivity-focused laptop, but they're not mass-market and no-one's really been able to make the idea stick yet. When the Atrix was around I often wondered why they didn't use the phone touch display as a trackpad/tablet, so it's interesting to see Razer go down that route. I rather suspect that this will end up being a niche product that quickly dies, though … it seems very few people want non-Windows productivity machines.