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Lenovo becomes world’s second biggest PC vendor

by Scott Bicheno on 13 October 2011, 12:22

Tags: Lenovo, IDC

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qa7nf

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Seizing the moment

The latest global PC market figures from market researcher IDC reveal that, while growth remains slow across the board, Lenovo is capitalising on the opportunities presented by the stumbles of its competitors.

Worldwide PC shipments increased by 3.6 percent in Q3, which was up from 2.7 percent in Q2, but below IDC's forcast of 4.5 percent growth for the quarter. This is mainly due to the persistently fraught nature of the global economy, and one of the reasons Lenovo has done relatively well is that things are better in Asia than in the West.

"For the moment, PCs have taken a backseat to a range of other devices competing for shrinking consumer and business budgets," said Jay Chou, IDC analyst. "While growth is expected to stay in mid-single digits in the fourth quarter, we should see faster growth in 2012 and beyond based on easier comparisons and refreshed PC offerings as the industry better addresses the evolving usage models by integrating more of the features in ultra mobile devices."

"Most vendors continue to struggle with the slow market environment and product changes," said Loren Loverde, IDC VP. "Although we don't see media tablets and other devices replacing PCs, questions on how products will evolve, and consumer interest in these and other categories are providing a distraction. And while price remains critical, many users are delaying PC purchases for the moment. Still, there are opportunities, as demonstrated by Lenovo's gains, and we expect PCs to find stronger demand in the coming years."

Lenovo has been very pro-active in the channel at a time when HP is struggling with the aftermath of saying it can't be bothered with the consumer market, Dell also seems more focused on the enterprise market, and Acer is still clearing up its EMEA carnage. ASUS overtook Toshiba for the number five spot thanks, in part, to a strong performance in emerging markets, while Apple continued its two year tend of 20 percent growth.

Lenovo CEO, Yuanqing Yang, saw fit to issue a public statement on the figures. Acer used to do that too: "Lenovo has captured incredible marketplace momentum to surpass two competitors to capture the number two spot in worldwide PCs over the span of just two quarters," said Yang. "This is the highest rank Lenovo has achieved in worldwide PC sales and, given the current competitive environment, positions the company as a strong challenger to ultimately become the global market leader."

 
Top 5 Vendors, Worldwide PC Shipments, Third Quarter 2011 (Preliminary) (Units Shipments are in thousands)

Rank

Vendor

3Q11

Shipments

Market

Share

3Q10

Shipments

Market

Share

3Q11/3Q10

Growth








1

HP

16,652

18.1%

15,811

17.8%

5.3%

2

Lenovo

12,579

13.7%

9,242

10.4%

36.1%

3

Dell

11,007

12.0%

11,183

12.6%

-1.6%

4

Acer Group

9,207

10.0%

11,592

13.1%

-20.6%

5

ASUS

6,002

6.5%

4,610

5.2%

30.2%









Others

36,432

39.7%

36,241

40.9%

0.5%









All Vendors

91,879

100.0%

88,679

100.0%

3.6%

Source: IDC Worldwide Quarterly PC Tracker, October 12, 2011

 



HEXUS Forums :: 8 Comments

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What ever happened to quality over quantity? These results are presented as a direct correlation to being the best PC maker in the world when that is blatantly false. Shipping massive amounts of computers doesn't mean they are necessarily of the best quality or last the longest, two pieces of information which are far more important in the equation of being the best PC maker in the world.

It's disturbing that very few people realize this or the fact that the market has distorted things so badly that these correlations are accepted as a given.
ExHail
These results are presented as a direct correlation to being the best PC maker in the world when that is blatantly false.

Where?
ExHail
What ever happened to quality over quantity? These results are presented as a direct correlation to being the best PC maker in the world when that is blatantly false. Shipping massive amounts of computers doesn't mean they are necessarily of the best quality or last the longest, two pieces of information which are far more important in the equation of being the best PC maker in the world.
Partially true - the vendors listed aren't the only ones guilty of turning out a lot of trash, and I fail to see the “best PC maker in the world” claim in the article. It does surprise me to see Asus on there - I know they ship a lot of laptops, but I can't remember the last time I saw an Asus desktop. And yes, I know they do ship a shedload of components - mainly because my PC's tend to use a majority of them.

I've had a couple of Acer's and they've been pretty flimsy (and the lack of service manuals etc really hacks me off), a couple of Dell's which have conversely all been darn good. The last Leonovo I bought (for a relative) was pretty solid - even though it was a “budget” model. I've got an Asus tablet - does that count? - which is good.

And of course, I'm honour-bound to state that all HP gear is just superb and you'd have to be a complete idiot to buy anything else. :rolleyes:

(Guess which company pays my salary? Hee-hee!)

If I had to buy a PC (which would more than likely be a laptop, since a desktop I'd build myself) then I'd probably head for Dell's range.
Scott B;2147209
Where?

I apologize for not giving an adequate frame of reference for that statement. It wasn't in reference to a particular statement in the article but rather the general consensus within markets that shipping more means being better.

The fact that there are few statistical assessments of PC vendor's quality is the key indicator of the distorted view point I was referring to, not specifically the author's but rather the industry as a whole. The focus for statistical analysis seems to be quantity which is sad.
ExHail
I apologize for not giving an adequate frame of reference for that statement. It wasn't in reference to a particular statement in the article but rather the general consensus within markets that shipping more means being better.

The fact that there are few statistical assessments of PC vendor's quality is the key indicator of the distorted view point I was referring to, not specifically the author's but rather the industry as a whole. The focus for statistical analysis seems to be quantity which is sad.

Fair points, and Acer is a classic example of the perils of chasing volume market share too aggressively. But surely statistical assessments are by definition quantitative, and they make no claims about the relative quality of the products - only their popularity.