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Blades and x86 systems lead Q4 server market rebound

by Scott Bicheno on 25 February 2010, 13:26

Tags: IDC

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Looking up

Market researcher IDC has released its worldwide quarterly server tracker and, while it confirms the market contracted by 18.9 percent, by revenue, in 2009, it also indicates that things are on the up, with Q4 only declining by 3.9 percent year-on-year.

As ever, all comparative Q4 numbers have to be viewed in the context of the global recession only really kicking off in Q4 2008 after it all went Pete Tong at Lehman, but nonetheless these figures offer grounds for optimism in the server market and for an overall improvement in business spend this year.

Volume (low-end) systems experienced the sharpest recovery, with mid-range next and high-end lagging. "Market conditions improved significantly in the fourth quarter as the marketplace transitioned from recent stability to growth in several critical server segments. Customers are actively re-evaluating their IT needs and refreshing their infrastructures, and the fourth quarter represents the beginning of a market inflection," said Matt Eastwood, group VP of IDC's enterprise server group.

"While many customers sat on the sidelines during 2009, significant innovation continued as server vendors prepared for an expanding market opportunity in 2010 and beyond. Optimal conditions for market inflection occur only once a decade and IDC believes that market shares could shift dramatically as the winners and losers of this new market cycle are determined, with those who are best positioned to meet increasingly sophisticated IT needs across the market gaining share."

Here are tables for Q4 and annual server market for the top five vendors. "In 2009, x86 servers captured more than 55% of all server revenue and more than 96% of all server units shipped worldwide," said Dan Harrington, research analyst. Vendors also managed to grow blade revenue over the course of the year.

Top 5 Corporate Family, Worldwide Server Systems Factory Revenue, Fourth Quarter of 2009 (Revenues are in Millions)

Vendor

Q4 2009

Revenue

Market

Share

Q4 2008

Revenue

Market

Share

Revenue Growth

Q409/Q408

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. IBM

$4,590

35.4%

$4,910

36.4%

-6.5%

2. HP

$3,950

30.5%

$3,920

29.1%

0.8%

3. Dell

$1,489

11.5%

$1,425

10.6%

4.5%

4. Sun

$1,032

8.0%

$1,247

9.3%

-17.3%

5. Fujitsu

$595

4.6%

$556

4.1%

7.2%

Others

$1,296

10.0%

$1,422

10.5%

-8.9%

 

 

 

 

 

 

All Vendors

$12,952

100%

$13,480

100%

-3.9%


Top 5 Corporate Family, Worldwide Server Systems Factory Revenue, Full Year 2009 (Revenues are in Millions)

Vendor

2009

Revenue

Market

Share

2008

Revenue

Market

Share

Revenue Growth

2009/2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. IBM

$14,191

32.9%

$16,937

31.8%

-16.2%

2. HP

$12,885

29.9%

$15,759

29.6%

-18.2%

3. Dell

$5,226

12.1%

$6,196

11.6%

-15.6%

4. Sun

$3,825

8.9%

$5,373

10.1%

-28.8%

5. Fujitsu

$2,186

5.1%

$2,508

4.7%

-12.8%

Others

$4,848

11.2%

$6,453

12.1%

-24.9%

 

 

 

 

 

 

All Vendors

$43,162

100%

$53,226

100%

-18.9%

IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Server Tracker, February 2010

 



HEXUS Forums :: 4 Comments

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What's the difference betwixt an X86 and a Blade?

Reason I ask is that I call AMD chips x86 but the web implies that x86 is only Intel stuff.

I like servers this week.. so I'm intrigued :)
AFAIK blades are just densely packed x86 systems - although I guess there's not really a reason to specify what type of CPU you have in your blades. Intel is usually referenced when people write x86 as they developed the instruction set, but an x86 AMD processor is still just that.
Steve
AFAIK blades are just densely packed x86 systems - although I guess there's not really a reason to specify what type of CPU you have in your blades. Intel is usually referenced when people write x86 as they developed the instruction set, but an x86 AMD processor is still just that.

No reason for blades to be x86 is there.

A blade is a marketing term for densly packed systems with a single points of failure, the blade ‘centre’ thingy. Ie the thing they go into.

Ie they are used for dense packing of systems what can handle some downtime.
indeed - blade is just a form factor :)
I suspect they include x64 servers in that umbrella , but I wouldn't like to say.