vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
facebook rss twitter

Raspberry Pi Model A+ is smaller, thinner, cheaper

by Mark Tyson on 10 November 2014, 10:20

Tags: Raspberry Pi Foundation

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qack7r

Add to My Vault: x

The Raspberry Pi foundation has launched a new model of its circuit-board development computer. The Raspberry Pi Model A+ is designed to fit in the space where the original Model A was positioned – as a lower cost version of the B. However the organisation has not just slimmed down the price of this model, it is smaller, thinner and consumes much less power whilst inheriting many of the Model B+ improvements.

Raspberry Pi Model A+

Raspberry Pi Model B+

65mm in length, 12mm thick

85mm in length, 17mm thick

Weighs 23g

Weighs 42g

consumes just 200mA

consumes 370mA

Priced at $20/£15

Priced at $38/£25

 

The Raspberry Pi Model A+ is the first RasPi to shrink below the 'credit card sized' standard that was set with the first model. The smaller size (around 55 x 65mm) will allow the computer to fit into even more portable and discrete situations. Its power consumption reduction will aid in portability as any battery drain will be reduced proportionately to the 45 per cent drop in consumption.

Compared to the B+ you lose the Ethernet network socket, have only 1 USB port and only half the RAM, (256MB rather than 512MB). But you still have many of the B+ 'essentials' including the 700MHz BCM2835 application processor, HAT standard GPIO header with 40 pins, push-push microSD and improved audio. Mount holes are kept in the same place of the circuit board for compatibility.

The new Raspberry Pi Model A+ is cheaper than the original Model A and considerably cheaper than its big brother the B+. We are told that the computer is still built in the Sony factory in South Wales.

For a video overview of the new RasPi A+ and feature highlights please see below.



HEXUS Forums :: 10 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
Only 1 usb port is a bit of a strange one. Once you've plugged in a wireless adaptor thats it. The only way this is practical is if using a powered USB hub with the Pi powered from it. Think the B+ with 4 USB's and ethernet offers better value IMHO.
I had to use a powered hub with the model B to reliably use several devices at once anyway. I wonder if they'll end up moving to a better CPU eventually, like introducing a model C or something.
marshalex
Only 1 usb port is a bit of a strange one. Once you've plugged in a wireless adaptor thats it. The only way this is practical is if using a powered USB hub with the Pi powered from it. Think the B+ with 4 USB's and ethernet offers better value IMHO.

I wouldn't say it's strange at all, because you even said it your self - there's a the B+ if the extra ports are needed.

I think the A+ is great, there are a number of applications I can think off of the top of my head that wouldn't even need USB ports at all, made better by the fact the A+ is smaller, lighter, consumes less power and has useable stand off holes!

EDIT: And it's much cheaper compared to other models, less to worry about if it gets lost on the way to the upper atmosphere or forgetting which tree it had been strapped to.
Badbonji
I had to use a powered hub with the model B to reliably use several devices at once anyway. I wonder if they'll end up moving to a better CPU eventually, like introducing a model C or something.

I think a “Pi 64” would fit well with the 1980's naming scheme, and a 64 bit upgrade would be what it takes to get me interested in one of these. They were always underpowered, had they been another tenner and more powerful I would have bought one.

Though I think what I really want is an ITX format board with a DRAM dimm socket or two so it is upgradable.
marshalex
Only 1 usb port is a bit of a strange one. Once you've plugged in a wireless adaptor thats it.
Does seem a bit strange, looking at the board itself it looks like there's enough room for two usb ports side by side, whilst keeping the size/height.