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Dell EMC intros PowerEdge servers with 2nd Gen AMD Epyc

by Mark Tyson on 18 September 2019, 11:11

Tags: Dell (NASDAQ:DELL), AMD (NYSE:AMD), EMC

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Dell EMC has announced a quintet of new PowerEdge servers which are built around AMD's latest and greatest 2nd Gen AMD Epyc processors. As well as providing "exceptional performance, management and security," the new servers have already set record for virtualized database performance and SAP SD benchmarks. This is an important design win for AMD as the five all-new designed from the ground-up, PowerEdge servers have been added to the world's bestselling server portfolio.

Multi-cloud world

"The modern data centre must embrace traditional and multi-cloud approaches, helping organizations become more agile, deliver new insights from data, and ultimately achieve results faster," said Ashley Gorakhpurwalla, President and GM, Server and Infrastructure Systems, at Dell Technologies. Gorakhpurwalla adds that the all-new Dell EMC PowerEdge designs coax the best from AMD's 2nd Gen Epyc processors to address those needs.

The press release about the new servers contains an array of impressive stats gained from early testing of the all-new Dell EMC PowerEdge servers. For example, the servers have set world records including 280 per cent greater single-socket virtualized database performance and the industry's top dual-socket performance result in the SAP Sales and Distribution (SAP SD) benchmark.

Another highlight is the greater bandwidth on offer - with up to 26 per cent more PCIe lanes with 60 per cent faster interconnect fabric, enabled by PCIe 4.0, the new servers "offer industry-leading capabilities for demanding network needs," says Dell. The latest innovations and capabilities delivered by Dell EMC with these new servers include; workload optimised system designs, efficient TCO, and security.

Alongside the release of the new servers Dell sought to highlight its new OpenManage advancements. Dell EMC OpenManage offers; increased management scalability for VMware vCenter, enhanced management to Microsoft environments, and ServiceNow integration. The Dell EMC Ready Solutions for HPC portfolio has been expanded too.

Many of the newly announced systems and software solutions are available now.

  • Dell EMC PowerEdge R6515 and R7515 servers are available worldwide now.
  • Dell EMC PowerEdge R6525 and C6525 servers have planned availability worldwide in October 2019.
  • Dell EMC PowerEdge R7525 servers have planned availability in early 2020.
  • Dell EMC OpenManage advancements are now available worldwide.
  • Dell EMC Ready Solutions for HPC Digital Manufacturing, Research and Life Science, with 2nd Gen AMD EPYC-based PowerEdge servers, will be available worldwide in October 2019.

For more information about how these new servers will be used it is worth a visit to the Direct2DellEMC blog.



HEXUS Forums :: 9 Comments

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Exciting news. Now all we need are Ryzen-based workstations. Not talking Threadripper here, and yes, they must support ECC memory as well. C'mon Dell, pick up the gauntlet.
azrael-
Exciting news. Now all we need are Ryzen-based workstations. Not talking Threadripper here, and yes, they must support ECC memory as well. C'mon Dell, pick up the gauntlet.

Erm, but Threadripper is exactly what I would want in a workstation. The sort of engineering tasks I want a workstation for still include lengthy single thread phases that the low boost clocks of an Epyc cpu just aren't good enough.
DanceswithUnix
Erm, but Threadripper is exactly what I would want in a workstation. The sort of engineering tasks I want a workstation for still include lengthy single thread phases that the low boost clocks of an Epyc cpu just aren't good enough.
What I need/want is the equivalent of a Xeon E(3) processor-based workstation. Considering that Ryzen 3000 is currently available with up to 12 cores (and soon 16 cores) would you really need more processing power? Perhaps I just didn't make myself clear, although I did explicitly state “Ryzen-based” and not “Epyc-based”. :)
azrael-
What I need/want is the equivalent of a Xeon E(3) processor-based workstation. Considering that Ryzen 3000 is currently available with up to 12 cores (and soon 16 cores) would you really need more processing power? Perhaps I just didn't make myself clear, although I did explicitly state “Ryzen-based” and not “Epyc-based”. :)

OK, that's a nice PC but not really the extra mile that I would class as workstation grade. But yes, with just 8 cores this is significantly faster than Xeon workstations I have used in the past thanks to that big L3 cache.

It is actually what I intended to do when I built this PC, but at the time ECC ram sticks had become oddly hard & expensive to find. You can get them for sane prices now, so next time I need to build a PC I'm getting a pair of ECC dimms and these ones can go in the new build. That's a home build though, for the likes of Dell to go that route would require official mobo ECC support which no-one seems to do.
>4 cores is enough to need a special high-performance computing licence on some software (ie ansys), if you don't have a specific need for >50 GB/s RAM then there's a lot you can do with consumer sockets these days