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QNAP launches 'value-priced' TS-419 Turbo NAS

by Parm Mann on 9 September 2009, 16:18

Tags: TS-419P, TS-419U, Qnap

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QNAP has today extended its line of Turbo NAS solutions with the launch of its TS-419P desktop and TS-419U rackmount NAS servers.

Dubbed as 'value-priced' models for the home or small business user, both units sport four hot-swappable 2.5in/3.5in SATA bays with a maximum theoretical capacity of 8TB.

Inside, QNAP has equipped the NAS with a 1.2GHz Marvell processor and 512MB of DDR2 memory. Both TS-419 models allow RAID 0, 1, 5, 6, 5+spare and JBOD configurations, and there's support for online RAID capacity expansion and online RAID level migration.

An iSCSI target service is built in, and each model is equipped with dual Gigabit LAN, four USB ports and two eSATA ports allowing for further storage expansion.

For business environments, the TS-419U (pictured above) squeezes all the functionality into a 1U chassis.

As always, QNAP's Turbo NAS units feature a built-in media server for use with a variety of DLNA-compliant devices, and both the TS-419P and TS-419U are armed with the third-version of QNAP's NAS management firmware.

As for pricing, well, QNAP may be touting the TS-419P as a 'value-priced' solution but the current retail price of £420 is likely to be out of reach for many home users.

Want to take a look at the TS-419's complete feature list? Check out QNAP's respective product pages: TS-419P and TS-419U



HEXUS Forums :: 11 Comments

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How about a feature pitting a home built file server vs a NAS like this.

I guess the simplest things to cover would be things like cost, power draw, transfer speeds etc…

If you wanted to be flash you could compare different options for the home built NAS, such as FreeNAS or even installing a ubuntu server on it.

These NAS's always seem overpriced for what they are. I've been meaning to look into a good home-built set up, but I've always had in mind that you could put something together that would take at least 4 drives for about £200. (assuming you don't use a hardware raid card). Actually, A third option of a homebuilt but with hardware raid card would get extra points :)
you could put and Atom based PC together and use FreeNAS for about that kind of money but its a pain in the arse to do when yu could just buy one of these.
GaryRW
These NAS's always seem overpriced for what they are. I've been meaning to look into a good home-built set up, but I've always had in mind that you could put something together that would take at least 4 drives for about £200. (assuming you don't use a hardware raid card). Actually, A third option of a homebuilt but with hardware raid card would get extra points :)
The hard part if building a PC that is a similar size to a NAS. You end of with expensive mini-ITX boards, struggling for RAID cards, and a decent case is near impossible to find.

That said, I still think they are over priced generally.
Funkstar
The hard part if building a PC that is a similar size to a NAS. You end of with expensive mini-ITX boards, struggling for RAID cards, and a decent case is near impossible to find.

That said, I still think they are over priced generally.

Then don't use hardware raid cards. The NAS boxes don't.
Well my custom built unraid box cost £100 for motherboard, processor and memory. Case would have been £60 if not repurposed and the licence was £40.

so for £200 without disks I got an all singing machine expandable upto 7TB or so (6x 1.5tb disks if required).

As I'm a hacker its actually running a full version of Slackware so it easily runs everything I want including 2 virtual machines for some windows programs I need.

Power consumption is also just 45w raising to 60w if I'm reading from all the disks.

Funkstar, I would question why do you need to a case the same size as your typical NAS. Personally bigger and more expandable would be better?