vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
facebook rss twitter

Kingston releases 1GB/s DataTraveler Max (USB Type-C)

by Mark Tyson on 31 August 2021, 11:11

Tags: Kingston

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaeq2s

Add to My Vault: x

Storage and memory specialist Kingston has released the DataTraveler Max (DT Max) USB Type-C flash drive. It claims record-breaking file transfer speeds for this new range of compact portable removable stick-format memory: up to 1,000MB/s read, 900MB/s write. The new DataTraveler Max is being made available in 256GB, 512GB, and 1TB capacities.

"DT Max offers industry-leading speeds and uncompromised storage space to enable consumers to create and keep up with today's content demands," said Carissa Blegen, flash product manager, at Kingston. "We deliver unparalleled performance that our customers have come to know and expect, and with this launch we are proud to set a new bar for USB-C flash drives."

Kingston provides the DT Max in a plastic ridged casing. On one end there is a cutout for connecting lanyards, key fobs etc. On the other end is the retractable standard USB Type-C male connector. The connector is extended and locked into place with a slide of a switch on the underside of the stick. Once you are finished, you can detach the drive from your device and slide the connector back into the shell to minimise the chance of damage or getting it filled with gunk/debris.

On the topic of the physical nature of this device, it is worth highlighting that the DT Max measures 82.17 x 22.00 x 9.02mm (weighs 12g). The dimensions make it nearly twice as long as the various thumb drives I have within reach (closer to the size of an actual big human thumb). The drive casing features an LED status indicator light.

Kingston doesn't reveal any technical data about the storage tech inside the stick. However, a technical piece of info you must bear in mind if you are looking at these storage sticks is that to get the full potential out of the transfers speeds, you will need a PC/laptop (Windows, Mac OS, Linux, Chrome OS supported) with a USB Type-C connector based on the USB 3.2 Gen 2 Standard.

The 1,000MB/s read and 900MB/s write speeds appear to apply to all three capacities. The Euro prices for these portable storage devices are as follows; 256GB - €108, 512GB - €156, 1TB - €265. Buyers get a five-year warranty.



HEXUS Forums :: 9 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
Unless these are a lot more reliable than many memory sticks I've experienced in the past, I'd be very nervous about using one of anything like a 1TB capacity. I'd rather stick to SSD. I use sticks for very temporary purposes, and can't think of a situation where I'd need these. Not for me, I think.
Saracen999
Unless these are a lot more reliable than many memory sticks I've experienced in the past, I'd be very nervous about using one of anything like a 1TB capacity. I'd rather stick to SSD. I use sticks for very temporary purposes, and can't think of a situation where I'd need these. Not for me, I think.

Most of the ‘faster’ memory sticks are basically just a custom shaped ssd with a usb interface these days. Even the external ssd's aren't that much different, it's more about shape of the board etc and hitting the price point they want to sell at (likely by using cheaper mem chips etc).

You can quite easily grab an external usb case for internal pcie drives these days, bit bigger in size but same principle as this really.
LSG501
Most of the ‘faster’ memory sticks are basically just a custom shaped ssd with a usb interface these days. Even the external ssd's aren't that much different, it's more about shape of the board etc and hitting the price point they want to sell at (likely by using cheaper mem chips etc).

You can quite easily grab an external usb case for internal pcie drives these days, bit bigger in size but same principle as this really.
That makes sense. And if this had arrived a year or so back might have found a home here. But as it is, I'm mid-process of stripping my old gear down, clearing out a number of old systems, and have just stuck in a (for me) huge HD repository of data on a NAS, a few decently fast 1TB SSDs on systems and redesigned where/how I store stuff to give a blend of sync'd fast access, much slower mass storage and structured backup. I could have used these …. or that new 8TB Sabrent Rocket 4 SSD …. no doubt, after recovering from the blood pressure spike induced by the price. ;)
1TB flash drives have certainly come down a bit in price. Last one I looked at cost over £990!

TBH, the only flash drive I ever had go slightly funny was an old Patriot one, from when USB3.0 first hit the market, and even that one is fine now.
I do miss the Corsair OTG drives with USB A at one end and MicroUSB at t'other for use with my phone. Far faster and easier than faffing with Bluetooth, wireless or cloud-based solutions. Happily, I have my eye on a rather novel one with USB-C instead of micro, which should do nicely if I actually get around to upgrading my phone this decade…
Saracen999
That makes sense. And if this had arrived a year or so back might have found a home here. But as it is, I'm mid-process of stripping my old gear down, clearing out a number of old systems, and have just stuck in a (for me) huge HD repository of data on a NAS, a few decently fast 1TB SSDs on systems and redesigned where/how I store stuff to give a blend of sync'd fast access, much slower mass storage and structured backup. I could have used these …. or that new 8TB Sabrent Rocket 4 SSD …. no doubt, after recovering from the blood pressure spike induced by the price. ;)

Yeah I'm in a similar sort of transition, high capacity nas for bulk storage, faster ssd based rig(s), it just seems a more balanced way to store things in the home/office for me.

I still sometimes need usb drives for file transfer from clients although I'm not sure a purely usb c connection is the best choice for that.