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AMD sketches out the next five years

by Ryan Martin on 1 April 2015, 13:30

Tags: AMD (NYSE:AMD)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qacqf4

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AMD revealed its five-year product strategy for the enterprise CPU and GPU markets at the PC Cluster Consortium event in Osaka, Japan. While the event took place on February 20th, it has taken until now for the news to filter through to English-language media. During its presentation, conducted by AMD's Junji Hayashi, the company released preliminary roadmaps to sketch out the release cycles of its new enterprise products.

The roadmaps provided are, at best, sketchy on details with no codenames or details about 'Next Gen' products disclosed by the Sunnyvale-based company. The key snippet of new information is AMD's intention to stick to two-year release cycles for enterprise APU and GPU products. Even-numbered years will mark the release of new GPU microarchitectures while odd-numbered years will bring new APUs.

Interestingly, the roadmap might lead you to the conclusion that AMD's next round of GPU products are destined for 2016 but the key thing to note is this presentation pertains to AMD's enterprise division of products - FirePro graphics, ARM and FirePro APUs and Opteron server processors. AMD's consumer products, including APUs, Radeon graphics and FX processors, have roadmaps of their own.

On the subject of processors, the second roadmap demonstrates that AMD is planning at least two more iterations of CPUs for its server line, whether or not these will be branded Opteron remains unclear. These new server CPU products have, in the past, been matched by equivalent releases in AMD's consumer line. If the same trend holds true then this roadmap confirms that AMD has no intentions of exiting the consumer CPU market despite the growing gap between itself and Intel's products.



HEXUS Forums :: 35 Comments

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Let's hope this is stricly for enterprise products. Why can they never give us some good info on high end desktop cpu's for the consumer? I can't believe they're just holding back on that anymore. It's been too long. I'm finding it hard to believe they've even got much in the works with regards to that. Losing hope now, Amd :(
ZaO
Let's hope this is stricly for enterprise products. Why can they never give us some good info on high end desktop cpu's for the consumer? I can't believe they're just holding back on that anymore. It's been too long. I'm finding it hard to believe they've even got much in the works with regards to that. Losing hope now, Amd :(

They have only been successful when they have kept what they are doing very quiet. It is frustrating, but I think necessary.
DanceswithUnix
They have only been successful when they have kept what they are doing very quiet. It is frustrating, but I think necessary.

IMO, as far as gaming CPUs go, they have only really been on par or better than Intel twice.
Once back in the early 90s when they licensed Intels CPUs design and made a 40MHz version of Intel's 33MHz 386 CPU (my first PC had an AMD 386-40 in :) ). They never got to license the CPU designs again!

The other time was when they moved the memory controller from the northbridge into the CPU…..and that happened while Intel were having a “lost the plot” period with the Pentium-D.

I don't think either can be attributed to being quiet. Both were due to AMD pulling something out of a hat, that Intel hadn't thought of (or had decided not to implement).

Today, in this era of trying to get blood out of a stone (in terms or designing CPUs), coupled with AMD selling off their fab, I doubt AMD are going to pull any major surprises….but if they just get to within 10% of whatever is the desktop i5 at the time, they will be back in the game.

The question is: Can they be bothered?

They might decide it's not worth the investment…..
shaithis
(my first PC had an AMD 386-40 in :) )

lol, same here. Amazing to think now that AMD was ever better at fabricating things than Intel.

shaithis
Both were due to AMD pulling something out of a hat, that Intel hadn't thought of (or had decided not to implement).

Erm, exactly. If AMD broadcast what they were capable of, Intel can follow fairly fast and with bucketloads of cash behind them can execute more easily.

Given that Intel seem to have picked up on every single thing that AMD have done, I don't think AMD can afford to be loud mouthed about anything. I mean, can you think of anything that Intel has done that has been original? Apart from the disasters like i432 and Itanium :D
Where are the desktop versions of the XBOX/PS4 apus?