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Intel Core i7-6950X Extreme Edition listed in support docs

by Mark Tyson on 4 April 2016, 10:31

Tags: Intel (NASDAQ:INTC)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaczvg

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Intel hasn't yet launched the Core i7-6950X Processor Extreme Edition processor. However, at the weekend, Intel published a change-log for its latest Management Engine software on its support site. In the CPU support list for this application we got both the official confirmation of this impending 14nm 'Broadwell-E' chip plus a couple of key specifications too.

The Intel Core i7-6950X Processor Extreme Edition is expected to be the flagship of the Broadwell-E range. These 14nm LGS2011-v3 socketed processors succeed the 22nm Haswell-E parts. According to Tweakers.net, which provided the Intel website link above, the i7-6950X will be the first Intel client CPU with 10 cores. Due to the core-count increase it is expected to raise the flagship price, once capped at around EUR999, by a significant amount.

As you can see in the screenshot above, the official confirmed specs of the Intel Core i7-6950X Processor Extreme Edition processor include a 25MB L3 cache and a top boost speed of 3.5GHz. From previously leaked info, this 10C/20T processor is expected to have a 3Ghz standard speed, and support DDR4-2400 RAM. Furthermore as an 'X' suffix processor we can say with a good level of confidence that the i7-6950X will have 'eXtreme' unlocked multipliers and voltages.

The Core i7-6950X Processor Extreme Edition is expected to be released with other members of the family at Computex Taipei 2016, which kicks off on 31st May this year.



HEXUS Forums :: 11 Comments

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Well I am about this can only dream of.
Think the cost is offset by the smaller process node and at this point the maturity of it, so they can add cores but not increase the price.
Otherwise who's going to be the market for such an expensive CPU? Even $1000 is extremely expensive, something like $1200 or more would be way too much.

Also considering most applications and games aren't optimized for more than 4 cores is another issue. Sure there are some who can take advantage of unlimited amount of cores, but overall those apps are rare.
SlickR
Think the cost is offset by the smaller process node and at this point the maturity of it, so they can add cores but not increase the price.

They can.. but they won't.
now its time to start to plan my new system
Is there a huge improvement to be able to stream games like League of Legends or CS:GO with a hexacore compared to an i-7 with 4 cores and 8 threads (4770k)?