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Rumoured AMD Carrizo benchmarks surface

by Ryan Martin on 20 January 2015, 13:00

Tags: AMD (NYSE:AMD)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qacnzb

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The database for the SiSoft Sandra benchmark has thrown up an interesting benchmark run for an AMD Engineering Sample that is identified as 'AMD Gardenia Carrizo'. As far as we know Gardenia implies that this is a mobile Carrizo part, which is further backed up by the fact the benchmark log shows SODIMM memory was used. The benchmark run, which was submitted a week ago, runs through a variety of CPU, GPU and memory tests before spitting out an overall system score.

CPU

Assessing the CPU component first the AMD Engineering sample, with four cores at 2.5GHz, attained a process arithmetic benchmark score of 28.59 GOPS. That score compares favourably to Intel's 2.6-watt Bay Trail J1900 that typically scores between 18-24 GOPS and is only a little slower than AMD's current desktop A10-7850K APU.

 
AMD A10-7850K
AMD Gardenia Carrizo
AMD E2-1800
Intel Celeron J1900
Processor Arithmetic (GOPS)
40.4
28.6
7.4
21.1
Processor Multi-Media (Mpix/s)
94.4
76.99
11.6
37.42

GPU

The AMD Gardenia Carrizo part produced 1.70GB/s of video memory bandwidth and 29.11Mpix/s of video shader compute. Context is also important here since the numbers only mean something relative to what else is on the market, and the below table makes a few comparisons. It is worth noting the APU makes use of DDR3-800 SODIMM memory for the video memory, meaning GPU performance is likely constrained.

In GPGPU compute, which is not bandwidth sensitive, the AMD Carrizo APUs fares much better offering up to 606Mpix/s.

 
AMD A10-7850K (R7 Graphics)
AMD Gardenia Carrizo
Nvidia GT 730
Intel Iris Pro HD 5200
Video Shader Compute (Mpix/s)
173
29
104
239
Video Memory Bandwidth (GB/s)
11.5
1.7
7.2
25.7
GPGPU Compute (Mpix/s)
298
606
156
207

Memory

Looking at the memory bandwidth the Carrizo APU scored 14.76GB/s - a seemingly impressive number given its limited system memory frequency. Finding a direct comparison to this is difficult since few systems use memory as slow as DDR3 800MHz. However, most logs for Intel and AMD desktop PCs in dual-channel configurations reveal results between 14-20GB/s with dual channel 1600MHz memory. The AMD Carrizo APU, therefore, seems to be working some kind of wizardry with memory bandwidth: HSA technology at play, perhaps?

While we can't be sure the database entry is legitimate, or what product it actually refers to, the results certainly do not seem far-fetched for AMD's recently announced mobile Carrizo APUs. This particular mobile part likely sits atop the Carrizo stack, so we'd estimate the TDP is probably in the 35-watt region given the fact this is a mobile part.

There are a lot of numbers to digest but if you want to make some comparisons of your own you can head over to the SiSoft Sandra database entry and take a look for yourself.



HEXUS Forums :: 7 Comments

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Another mobile CPU is not what AMD needs atm since the mid to high range desktop CPU region is currently owned by Intel. New CPUs in that area is what AMD needs not only for them but also to help keep the prices of the area from exploding.
demothon
Another mobile CPU is not what AMD needs atm since the mid to high range desktop CPU region is currently owned by Intel. New CPUs in that area is what AMD needs not only for them but also to help keep the prices of the area from exploding.

I disagree. While that would be better for us enthusiasts (in terms of power and price competition,) we're not the mass market. The mass market is in laptops and mobile. The vast bulk of the remaining desktop systems sold are to businesses, in this area AMDs APUs are a better fit and are competitive. High end desktop CPU only just isn't that big a market segment for AMD or anyone else.
demothon
Another mobile CPU is not what AMD needs atm since the mid to high range desktop CPU region is currently owned by Intel. New CPUs in that area is what AMD needs not only for them but also to help keep the prices of the area from exploding.

If you follow the link to SiSoft it says:

Global Rank #11,978
Position Higher than 91.43% ranked results
Qualification Excellent Performance ;)

so for a mass market laptop chip, I would say that is pretty good. Unfortunately if this leak is true, then Intel now know what to expect and can adjust prices accordingly to make sure no-one makes boards with these chips on.
I'd be very worried for amd if a 35w cpu was slower than a 10w one!
Oh, wow a 35W CPU beats out a 10W Celeron and and 18W AMD CPU… trying not to be cynical but it's hard.

If it really is 35W part here then with 3.5x more TDP to play with it doesn't seem to exhibit great performance per watt compared to the J1900.