vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
Win with Seagate - Seagate FireCuda 510 SSD! [x]
facebook rss twitter

Ofcom lays foundations for 5G networking in the UK

by Tarinder Sandhu on 19 January 2015, 10:05

Tags: Ofcom

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qacnxv

Add to My Vault: x

Ofcom has started the groundwork needed to set sail for the 5G communications future. While most people in the UK only receive fleeting access to 4G services right now, dependent upon provider and location, the telecoms regular thinks it is important to be a leader in the next generation of wireless communications, reports the FT.

When 5G eventually arrives it is expected to be able to deliver data speeds in the range from 10 to 50Gbit/s. This would represent a 3,000 fold increase in speeds according to the FT. Ofcom says the average 4G customer in the UK today receives data at an average 15Mbit/s.

It is foreseen that the fantastic data speeds of 5G would usher in new uses for mobiles. For example Ofcom said we might have relatives "virtually attending family occasions," via real-time holographic video. In medicine we might get specialist surgeons working remotely using 3D medical imaging over 5G.

A big question concerning the rollout of 5G services concerns what parts of the finite spectrum available will it use to transmit data. To achieve the highest transfer speeds large blocks of frequencies are required, yet these are difficult to find at lower frequencies, says Ofcom. So it is looking closely at higher frequency bands like those above 6GHz, for example.

"We want to explore how high frequency spectrum could potentially offer significant capacity for extremely fast 5G mobile data," said Philip Marnick, Ofcom Spectrum Group Director. "This could pave the way for innovative new mobile services for UK consumers and businesses."

Currently Spectrum above 6GHz is mainly used for scientific research, satellite broadcasting and weather monitoring. The telecoms body has to work with industry to make the best use of available spectrum so is consulting from now until 27 February 2015 about how this high frequency spectrum can be used/shared.

It is thought that the first commercial 5G services will appear from around 2020. It is Ofcom's hope that the UK becomes a leader in laying the foundations of 5G and that 5G must represent a step beyond anything offered by 4G in speeds and in giving users the 'impression of infinite capacity'.



HEXUS Forums :: 6 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
Hmm, well when I see holographic projects on sale at realistic prices, I'll see the need for mobile 5G networks for public use.

That said, for outside broadcast use by small operators, %G with suitable upload speeds will offer some benefits.
While most people in the UK only receive fleeting access to 4G services right now, dependent upon provider and location, the telecoms regular thinks it is important to be a leader in the next generation of wireless communications, reports the FT.
I'd agree with this quote, especially that last bit. However, they're supposedly upgrading the local towers to support 4G and the only upshot I've noticed is that I lose my 3G connection, and when it is present it's at reduced signal strength. So not impressed.
It is thought that the first commercial 5G services will appear from around 2020. It is Ofcom's hope that the UK becomes a leader in laying the foundations of 5G and that 5G must represent a step beyond anything offered by 4G in speeds and in giving users the ‘impression of infinite capacity’.
And giving the operators the “impression of infinite bills”. Bet EE launches a 5G service with sub-1G data limits. :wallbash:

Sniping at the teleco's aside, I'd be interested to hear if Ofcom are doing anything to prevent the overusage of the service, the same way that many have complained has already happened to 4G - to the extent that I've seen some people commenting that they had faster 3G!

Said this before, but I'll repeat myself. Having incredible “headlines” speeds is all well and good, but it's no good for man nor beast if those speeds aren't achievable widely, and especially outside of heavily urbanised locations.
Agreed, 4G is so fast already I just cant possibly see a benefit from 5G. I know you may say the future will require it, but to be honest with it evolving faster than home broadband already Id suggest it would be better to properly roll out 3G/4G as opposed to polarising the UK further and jumping to 5G… IMHO! (Im even in London and dont get 4G more than 1hour a day on Vodafone).
oh… another #g I won't be able to receive… call me when I finally receive 3g in my home.

Honestly instead of focusing on the next #G which will likely be restricted to such stupidly small amounts of data how about ofcom deals with the black spots for 3G (or heaven forbid 4G) and the overpriced charges for using data.

I'd also prefer to see improvements to landline speeds over mobile speeds… seriously we should be able to get gigabit connections for reasonable prices by now but because bt wanted to live in the dark ages we still stuck on copper restricting any real developments in landline internet.
LSG501
oh… another #g I won't be able to receive… call me when I finally receive 3g in my home. Honestly instead of focusing on the next #G which will likely be restricted to such stupidly small amounts of data how about ofcom deals with the black spots for 3G (or heaven forbid 4G) and the overpriced charges for using data.
+1 to all of this. It still “amuses” me that Voda, O2, etc still seem to be stuck in the era of making long calls and sending endless texts, but with only a smattering of mobile data. Three, imho, is the only operator that gets the balance right. And the 4G products from Voda/EE only make that worse - with generous call allowances but niggardly data caps … unless you want to spend a LOT of money with them per month of course.
LSG501
I'd also prefer to see improvements to landline speeds over mobile speeds… seriously we should be able to get gigabit connections for reasonable prices by now but because bt wanted to live in the dark ages we still stuck on copper restricting any real developments in landline internet.
I'm going to disagree here - I'm firmly of the opinion that BT are the problem, not the solution. It's probably horribly “socialist” of me, but given the strategic nature of WAN provision these days (for businesses and delivery of government services) I'd be quite happy with the idea that BT loses the responsibility for the backbone and that goes to some dedicated org … eTrack? Especially if managers of said quango are paid solely on results, so no delivery, no fat bonus.

But you've got a point though - if we get this “marvellous” 5G wireless then why the heck do we need scrappy old ADSL? (Says the guy using Virgin's cable broadband).