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Review: Mionix Avior 7000 and Naos 7000

by Parm Mann on 7 February 2014, 15:30

Tags: Mionix

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Software

We prefer our peripherals to be of the plug-and-play variety, yet while the Mionix mice will function with no added software, you need to install an optional software utility to make the most of the available feature set. Available to download from mionex.net/support, the software is a lightweight 20MB package that's easy to obtain, install and use.

Laid out in a logical fashion, all of the available settings are categorised within five separate tabs; mouse settings; sensor performance; colour settings; macro settings; support.

There's plenty to play with and just about every facet of the mouse can be customised to your needs. All buttons can be easily reassigned, polling-rate adjustments are supported, precise DPI settings are available - including options for angle snapping/tuning - and a comprehensive macro-recording mechanism is also included.

Mionix has five user profiles available for selection, but there's no dedicated switch on the device itself, so users wanting to quickly move between profiles will have to reassign a button for that purpose. Similarly, the LEDs that illuminate the scroll wheel and Mionix logo are infinitely-configurable through software, but if you choose to take the plug-and-play route, you'll be limited to a solid blue colour with no means of turning off the light.

Onboard memory is used to store user-defined macros, but there's only so much that can be done through hardware alone. Mionix's accompanying software is no burden, and it's worth installing if you want maximum customisation. Heck, there's even a 'Surface Quality Analyzer Tool' that purports to test to your mouse mat for maximum recognition. Our cheap-and-cheerful pad scored a respectable 70 per cent.

Performance and Conclusion

The ergonomic Naos 7000 is our pick of the two - it's one of the most comfortable mice we've ever used - and it's worthy of consideration for any gamer looking to upgrade to a high-quality unit.

The obvious question is whether or not an optical sensor should still be considered a genuine downgrade over the sought-after laser? The answer has to be no, not at all.

During use, Mionix's optical mice felt every bit as accurate and responsive as the laser models we're accustomed too, and though the 7,000 DPI sensor is overkill for any usage scenario we can think of, there's more than enough range to cover precise navigation and large, sweeping movements.

In terms of tracking, the only qualm we have is the fact that an optical sensor isn't as versatile across different surface types. The 7000-series mice had no trouble tracking accurately on a desk or different mouse pads, but switching to reflective surfaces proved to be problematic, with the cursor visibly stuttering as the sensor struggled to cope.

But that, really, is about the only real blotch on an otherwise impressive specification sheet. We'd like both models to be a little heavier to suit our own personal preference, but there's no doubt about it, the Avior 7000 and Naos 7000 are well-built, stylish, extremely accurate, and highly customisable through an easy-to-use software package.

The ergonomic Naos 7000 is our pick of the two - it's one of the most comfortable mice we've ever used - and it's worthy of consideration for any gamer looking to upgrade to a high-quality unit.

Mionix Avior 7000

Mionix Naos 7000

The Good

Sleek, stylish design
Braided USB cable
Precise optical sensor
Adjustable DPI
Customisable backlight
Easy-to-use software

The Bad

Wheel doesn't support horizontal scrolling
Lacks adjustable weight mechanism
No hardware DPI indicator

The Good

Very comfortable to use
Sleek, stylish design
Braided USB cable
Precise optical sensor
Adjustable DPI
Customisable backlight
Easy-to-use software

The Bad

Wheel doesn't support horizontal scrolling
Lacks adjustable weight mechanism
No hardware DPI indicator


Mionix Avior 7000

Mionix Naos 7000


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A wide range of Mionix gaming peripherals are available to purchase direct from eu.mionix.net.

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At HEXUS, we invite the companies whose products we test to comment on our articles. If any company representatives for the products reviewed choose to respond, we'll publish their commentary here verbatim.



HEXUS Forums :: 1 Comment

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After using laser for a long while and going back to optical just before Christmas I don't think I will ever go back to laser unless something major changes.

No one really needs the high DPI that lasers have and most people who game use a mouse mat anyway so the surface compatibility is a somewhat moot point. On the other hand optical is more accurate, has no acceleration, has lower lift off distances, has less jitter, etc. Really no reason to use a laser.

OT: These look like nice mice if I hadn't recently purchased a Steelseries Rival I would definitely be considering the Naos.