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Quiet PC offers two year warranty as standard

by Scott Bicheno on 12 June 2009, 14:16

Tags: Quiet PC

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qasm2

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Peace of mind

British PC component e-tailer and distie QuietPC has announced it's extending a minimum two year warranty to all products it sells direct to end users.

As e-tailers turn increasingly to customer service in order to differentiate themselves in the current challenging market conditions, it looks like Quiet PC decided return rates were sufficiently low to make this offer feasible.

"We are very choosy about the products and brands we stock, and we want our customers to share the confidence we have in their performance," said Glenn Garrett, managing director of Quiet PC.

 "Furthermore, I believe it is only a matter of time before Britain adopts new draft EU legislation making reference to providing longer warranties for electrical and electronic products, so we decided to lead by example and show our loyal customers that we warmly welcome proper and decent protection for their right to enjoy worry-free computing."

 



HEXUS Forums :: 9 Comments

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very nice to know, always been on the pricey side for me but still a good etailer
they are a little bit more costly but maybe now this makes it worth while?

Although does this cover OEM CPUs?
Not to disparage the effort, but surely the Sale of Goods Act covers this already ?
Retail customers are given a “reasonable” amount of time over which the retailer and/or the manufacturer are responsible for the item not failing under the use for which the item was intended. Don't get me wrong, it's always nice to have specific terms in writing, but if you buy a brand spanking new computer for £2000 and it fails after 2 years and 1 day, then I'm chasing people up about it. I'm not looking at the terms that have been forced upon me and that could, arguably, contravene my statutory rights and giving up.

UK consumer law is very, very, strong and suffers greatly from the obfuscation attempted on behalf of many retailers in an apparent attempt to either get out of their obligations under the law and/or charging people for “extended warranties” that are almost unnecessary.
pointless article- already covered by the sale of goods act.
amdavies
Not to disparage the effort, but surely the Sale of Goods Act covers this already ?
Retail customers are given a “reasonable” amount of time over which the retailer and/or the manufacturer are responsible for the item not failing under the use for which the item was intended. Don't get me wrong, it's always nice to have specific terms in writing, but if you buy a brand spanking new computer for £2000 and it fails after 2 years and 1 day, then I'm chasing people up about it. I'm not looking at the terms that have been forced upon me and that could, arguably, contravene my statutory rights and giving up.

UK consumer law is very, very, strong and suffers greatly from the obfuscation attempted on behalf of many retailers in an apparent attempt to either get out of their obligations under the law and/or charging people for “extended warranties” that are almost unnecessary.

unfortunatly every company i know tries to get out of it :(