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Review: AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700

by Parm Mann on 7 July 2019, 14:00

Tags: AMD (NYSE:AMD)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaebgi

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Conclusion

...the streamlined RDNA architecture delivers a meaningful performance uplift over the disappointing Vega cards of the past generation...

You've heard it a thousand times but it's a point worth reiterating; competition is good for the marketplace. The arrival of AMD's RDNA architecture has already forced Nvidia to retaliate with RTX Super graphics cards, and AMD's retort has been to lower the launch price of its first Navi GPUs. Interesting times, and in the weeks ahead, consumers will be hoping for a better deal as the two companies jostle for position in the mid-to-high-end segment.

The launch of Radeon RX 5000 Series cards will inevitably be met by a mixed reception - some will have hoped for more, while others will view the new release as the best Radeons to date. There's merit to both arguments, yet while the Radeons of recent years have disappointed in key areas, we come away feeling as though the RX 5700 Series gets most things right.

Doing more with less, the streamlined RDNA architecture delivers a meaningful performance uplift over the disappointing Vega cards of the past generation, and efficiency improvements on the cutting-edge 7nm process help lower power consumption to more agreeable levels. Those are the two things near the top of most users' lists for a 2019 Radeon GPU, and with promising Ryzen 3rd Gen CPUs, a forward-looking X570 chipset and a growing selection of FreeSync monitors, there's now good reason to consider investing heavily in the AMD ecosystem.

Radeon RX 5700 XT is ultimately a fine choice for high-quality QHD gaming, and to a lesser extent so is the RX 5700, and re-evaluated launch-day pricing of $399 and $349, respectively, enables both models to stand proud in the face of competing cards that are at times quicker while touting baked-in hardware support for ray tracing.

Bottom line: this is a safe start to AMD's RDNA journey and custom-cooled partner cards can't come soon enough.

The Good
 
The Bad
More efficient Navi architecture
Smooth high-quality gaming at QHD
Faster than Vega while using less power
Forward-looking PCIe 4.0
 
Reference cooler could be better
Custom partner cards not ready yet



AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT


AMD Radeon RX 5700

HEXUS.where2buy*

The AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT and RX 5700 graphics cards will be available to purchase from Scan Computers.

HEXUS.right2reply

At HEXUS, we invite the companies whose products we test to comment on our articles. If any company representatives for the products reviewed choose to respond, we'll publish their commentary here verbatim.



*UK-based HEXUS community members are eligible for free delivery and priority customer service through the SCAN.care@HEXUS forum.



HEXUS Forums :: 25 Comments

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The new AMD GPUs seem competitive with NVidia's 2060/2070 at various points, and sometimes even 2080, so it will pretty much come down to price, and individual games that people play. Hopefully a few months down the line we'll see something like a 5800/5800XT.
Ohh shxt….Now I dunno if a RTX 2060 Super is the best choice I can make at the moment.
Wow. Not a blow you away type performance, but quietly these cards are better performance and/or lower cost and lower power than nVidia, even after the ‘super’ refresh. I still think the ‘mid-range’ is too pricey, but if you're there then AMD have just won it.
Interesting review. It's a pity the partner cards are still 5 weeks away roughly, not sure if a blower card is for me.

Just on the AMD website, they state the RX 580 typically uses 185 W with a recommended 500 watt psu here:

https://www.amd.com/en/products/graphics/radeon-rx-580#product-specs

But the RX 5700 they state it will typically use 180 W, with a recommended 600 W psu here:

https://www.amd.com/en/products/graphics/amd-radeon-rx-5700#product-specs

Am I missing something here? Does the RX 5700 really need a 600W psu or is AMD just playing it safe? Maybe AMD can clarify on this at some point.

Edit:

My Corsair HX 520W will probably be fine having triple +12V rails etc. Might hold off and see if Doom Eternal has a nice RTX reveal at QuakeCon at the end of the month. I wouldn't be surprised if Nvidia had that up their sleeve as a trump card of sorts.
Everyone who wanted an RTX GPU with the RT cut off at a lower price, here's just that (and on scan for less than 1USD:1GBP, which is nice). It's impressive how closely matched they are with the (more expensive) nvidia cards - the super series are consistently a couple of fps ahead and within a few watts, which is unexpected given the differences in architecture.

The cooler/fan curve is well designed too, matching a normal cooler for noise is impressive - I wonder how much that was helped by a higher core temp, and how much of the difference was down to the higher ambient?

The Hand;4112471
Interesting review. It's a pity the partner cards are still 5 weeks away roughly, not sure if a blower card is for me.

Just on the AMD website, they state the RX 580 typically uses 185 W with a recommended 500 watt psu here:

https://www.amd.com/en/products/graphics/radeon-rx-580#product-specs

But the RX 5700 they state it will typically use 180 W, with a recommended 600 W psu here:

https://www.amd.com/en/products/graphics/amd-radeon-rx-5700#product-specs

Am I missing something here? Does the RX 5700 really need a 600W psu or is AMD just playing it safe? Maybe AMD can clarify on this at some point.

Edit:

My Corsair HX 520W will probably be fine having triple +12V rails etc. Might hold off and see if Doom Eternal has a nice RTX reveal at QuakeCon at the end of the month. I wouldn't be surprised if Nvidia had that up their sleeve as a trump card of sorts.

Recommended PSU numbers are always useless, as long as you've got a reputable brand PSU then you can run it much closer to rated capacity then they suggest. Hexus tests their reviewed PSUs at full capacity, when's the last time they reported a PSU under review went pop?