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Razer Atheris premier mobile productivity mouse launched

by Mark Tyson on 16 August 2017, 11:31

Tags: Razer

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qadkq4

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Razer has announced a new mouse aimed at portable productivity and gaming, or as Razer puts it, 'spreadsheets and headshots'. The new Razer Atheris is claimed to be "the ultimate wireless notebook mouse with the world's longest-lasting battery life, and lag-free wireless gaming-grade performance". It's described by Razer as an ambidextrous ergonomic design but I can see side thumb buttons only on the left side of the rodent.

The Razer Atheris connects wirelessly via Bluetooth LE or 2.4GHz Wi-Fi using the supplied optional dongle. If you want to get the best battery life, over 300 hours on 2x AA batteries, you might prefer the Bluetooth LE connection mode. However, for the most reliable, stable connection you will likely use the compact 2.4GHz dongle (which stores away in the mouse for transport) which uses Razer's proprietary wireless Adaptive Frequency Technology (AFT).

Inside, the Atheris packs a 7,200 DPI optical sensor with up to 220IPS / 30G. That's great across multiple high resolution monitors, says Razer. The mouse offers on the fly sensitivity adjustment, as you might rerquire. As mentioned above, the Atheris has two thumb buttons and these make up the total of five independently programmable 'Hyperesponse buttons' available. The scroll wheel is said to be designed to be 'gaming grade' and is tactile. Razer's Synapse software can be used to configure this LED-free mouse.

Product features:

  • 350-hour continuous use on a single pair of AA batteries (On Bluetooth mode)
  • 7,200 DPI optical sensor
  • Dual connectivity
  • In-built Bluetooth (BLE)
  • 4 GHz connection with Adaptive Frequency Technology
  • Ambidextrous ergonomic form factor
  • Compact and mobile ready (Dongle fits in the mouse, no extra carrying case required)
  • Five independently programmable Hyperesponse buttons
  • Approximate size: 99.7 mm / 3.9 in (Length) X 62.8 mm / 2.5 in (Width) X 34.1 mm / 1.35 in (Height)
  • Approximate weight 66g / 0.14 lbs (Excluding batteries)

The Razer Atheris is available immediately via the online store at Razerzone.com priced at U.S. $49.99 / EU €59.99. It will become available in stores worldwide from Q4 2017.



HEXUS Forums :: 8 Comments

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I am surprised nobody has made a self charging mouse,using hand movements to trickle charge an internal battery.
CAT-THE-FIFTH
I am surprised nobody has made a self charging mouse,using hand movements to trickle charge an internal battery.

The obvious method using inertia to move a magnet relative to coils in the mouse (like a shake torch) might play merry hell with accuracy?

A magnet in a mouseball (which could be implemented even if tracking remained optical) or a grid of magnets embedded in the mousemat would allow electricity generation during movement rather than during accelleration? I suspect a Qi enabled mousemat might be simpler though.
Energy harvesting stuff just isn't really practical yet. You just don't tend to get enough energy out and once you start using it to charge a battery you get efficiency losses and it all becomes a big pointless mess. As above, you could use a ball with an electromagnetic kind of deelie but then you're going back to the horrors of ball mice. Qi charging mat would make a lot more sense but given the batteries in my wireless mouse last around a month (and it's an ancient mouse as well so the batteries aren't in the best of nick) and it requires about an hour to charge, it's really like using a sledgehammer to crack the proverbial nut. The inconvenience of charging is minor and the cost of such tech is relatively huge.
Brian224
I suspect a Qi enabled mousemat might be simpler though.


It's already out there. http://gaming.logitech.com/en-us/product/powerplay-wireless-charging
Brian224
The obvious method using inertia to move a magnet relative to coils in the mouse (like a shake torch) might play merry hell with accuracy?

A magnet in a mouseball (which could be implemented even if tracking remained optical) or a grid of magnets embedded in the mousemat would allow electricity generation during movement rather than during accelleration? I suspect a Qi enabled mousemat might be simpler though.

Well in watches they have mechanisms like the Seiko Kinetic which trickle charges a battery(yes,I know its probably a much lower level of power required),but even on a prototype level I am surprised its not even been tried out as a proof of concept.

You could also seal the mouse entirely which means it could actually be used in quite adverse conditions.