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DFI showcases BIOSecure technology, takes the worry out of BIOS updates

by Parm Mann on 8 June 2009, 10:32

Tags: DFI (TPE:2397)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaskj

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2009's COMPUTEX trade show may have drawn to a close, but the relentless HEXUS coverage is anything but over.

With our feet back on UK soil, we're taking a look back at some of the week's other new products and we're starting today with DFI's LanParty UT P55-T3eH10 - one of the company's upcoming P55-based boards for Intel's Core i5.

We've seen no shortage of P55 boards this week - and we managed to sneak in a H57 board, too - so why are we turning the spotlight to DFI's derivative? The answer's in the attached USB cable:

DFI's board is equipped with a technology that the Taiwanese outfit has dubbed BIOSecure. What it does is allow users to flash a board's BIOS remotely from another system connected via mini USB. Oh so simple, and the board doesn't even need an additional power source.

Mighty useful if you've had a BIOS update gone wrong, and it creates a simple means of at least attempting to resurrect a seemingly dead board. DFI looks set to introduce the patented tech on its P55 boards, and we'd expect to see it on many of the company's other boards shortly after.


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HEXUS Forums :: 9 Comments

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How's this any better than Gigabytes DualBIOS method? Also, I'd have put the mini-USB slot on the motherboard instead of the I/O ports. It's not as if BIOS updates are a daily occurrence.
aidanjt
How's this any better than Gigabytes DualBIOS method?
Say you insert a component that isn't supported by either BIOS in the DualBIOS, how do you recover?

This DFI is neat because it's a way for you to recover from an unbootable problem.

Likewise it gives home support a way to flash to defaults without having to open up the case, which saves time, space and inconvienience for the user.
Actually this does sound really good. I like it.

Would have solved Arthurleung's problem with a new Shuttle system he built. The BIOS didn't support the newest CPU he bought for it, and didn't have an older one to boot with to flash the BIOS.
kalniel
Say you insert a component that isn't supported by either BIOS in the DualBIOS, how do you recover?
By removing said component, and flashing. I thought that'd be obvious?
aidanjt
By removing said component, and flashing. I thought that'd be obvious?
See above :)

It's an issue when the component is the CPU