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Intel Skylake CPUs due between August 15 and January 16

by Ryan Martin on 21 May 2015, 16:46

Tags: Intel (NASDAQ:INTC)

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Intel currently offers two different CPU microarchitectures in the marketplace, Haswell is the most current design for desktop and high-performance notebook users while Broadwell is the latest for many mobile platforms using the recently released Core M series of processors. For desktop users Broadwell is expected to make a brief appearance with the Core i7-5775C and Core i5-5675C but these are rumoured to be the only Broadwell desktop parts that will be made available. Intel's mainstream LGA desktop CPUs will effectively skip Broadwell to go straight to Skylake.

According to a launch timetable published by a Chinese technology website the Skylake rollout starts as soon as August this year. Intel will release the Skylake-S parts in August and September which includes the unlocked desktop offerings, notably the Core i7-6700K and the Core i5-6600K. Recent simulated benchmarks predicted that the Core i7-6700K will be about 15 per cent faster than current flagship Core i7-4790K, an incremental rather than revolutionary leap forward. Other members of the S family include locked Core i5 and i7 desktop processors as well as low-power T-series parts that likely conform to 35-watt TDPs.

In September Intel will also begin the release of Skylake-H which primarily targets high performance notebooks but also some Xeon segments. Rollout of Skylake-H ends in November and includes parts that will likely be featured in refreshed gaming notebooks such as the Core i7-6920HQ, Core i7-6820HQ and Core i7-6700HQ.

The Skylake U and Y series parts will both be released with a staggered timetable. The first wave of parts arrive in September then additional parts, which are presumably speed-bumped, will arrive later in January 2016. The U series parts include the Core i7-6500U and Core i5-6200U, these CPUs are typical candidates for Ultrabooks, 2-in-1s and NUC-style devices. Skylake-Y parts will be integrated into the new Core M series which has featured in a variety of slim and low-power tablets and notebooks, such as the Dell Venue 11 Pro HD and the Apple MacBook.



HEXUS Forums :: 12 Comments

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Dear sir or madam -

The benchmarks you keep alluding to have been shown to not even be benchmarks, but supposition based on pre-existing hardware performance. They aren't real. Please quit posting them as real.

Thank you.
So much for Broadwell then :-(
GuidoLS
Dear sir or madam -

The benchmarks you keep alluding to have been shown to not even be benchmarks, but supposition based on pre-existing hardware performance. They aren't real. Please quit posting them as real.

Thank you.

A source debunking those benchmarks would be greatly appreciated. I was not aware they were performance estimates as you claim.
RyanM
GuidoLS
Dear sir or madam -

The benchmarks you keep alluding to have been shown to not even be benchmarks, but supposition based on pre-existing hardware performance. They aren't real. Please quit posting them as real.

Thank you.

A source debunking those benchmarks would be greatly appreciated. I was not aware they were performance estimates as you claim.

From the webpage - no charge for the bad Google translate - note the bold.

Intel Skylake 1151 with the name of the new processor socket ( 6700 Core i7 and Core i5 6600) we announced earlier will come in June. So i7 Processor 6700 the predecessor of the 4790 i7 performance when compared with how much to reveal farku? Skylake movement curve associated with the following processors possible , we have prepared performance graphics. Intel i7 6700 benchmark test that takes place in this comparison were prepared on the basis of performances given by Intel's processors in the previous year.

They admit they are basing their information off of prior information, and how the Skylake *should* perform based on released specs. You'll also note that, in the comments, user CeeGee posted a direct link to where the 3DMark scores were ‘cribbed’ from.

They may be a good educated guess - they are not benchmarks.

Edit to add -

also, of more importance as to what is there is what isn't there. No motherboard. No memory. No graphics. No PSU. No mass storage of any kind. You can't do benchmarks without all of those.
Cheers on the correction. Appreciate the efforts of everyone here at Hexus, and appreciate the writers taking (sometimes churlish) input from the readers.