vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
facebook rss twitter

Intel supplies further details on Broadwell and its 14nm process

by Mark Tyson on 12 August 2014, 10:59

Tags: Intel (NASDAQ:INTC)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qachnj

Add to My Vault: x

Intel has released a slew of information detailing its upcoming Broadwell microarchitecture and the manufacturing process behind these 14nm chips. The chip making giant asserts that together these developments will "provide high-performance and low-power capabilities to serve a broad array of computing needs and products from the infrastructure of cloud computing and the Internet of Things to personal and mobile computing".

Intel Core M

The first Broadwell chip to reach the market will be the Intel Core M. You can see the slide detailing this particular processor's qualities above. Intel said that from the introduction of the original Intel Core processor in 2010 to the new Intel Core M "soon" in 2014, the common-or-garden notebook will have been reduced from 26mm thick to 7.2mm thick, TDP will have been reduced by a quarter, graphics improved seven fold and general processing doubled in speed.

Comparing the Broadwell chip to more recent designs (as illustrated above) Intel said that Broadwell boasts a board area reduction of around 25 per cent compared to Haswell. Turbo boost and power reduction technologies have been enhanced to get the most out of these new chips. In addition the new Broadwell chips will enable fanless designs that are less than 9mm thick, better performance than Haswell-Y but with a greater than 2x reduction in TDP and a 60 per cent lower idle power.

14nm technology

Intel's new 14nm process is now being used for volume production. The process's trigate fins have been made taller, thinner and closer together resulting in faster speeds, less power consumption and fewer fins needed per transistor. Less material used should also help reduce cost per transistor. Intel says that the new 14nm technology will be used for a very wide range of processors from high performance parts to "low-power products including servers, personal computing devices and Internet of Things".

The first systems packing Broadwell processors have been promised for the 'holiday season' with wider processor availability for OEMs in the months following.



HEXUS Forums :: 8 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
Will be interesting to see what gains are made at the high end, now AMD has effectively stopped targeting that segment.
Is it the video that mentions > 5% IPC gains? As I don't see mention of it in the article.
It's included in the third slide from the top entitled ‘Broadwell Converged-Core’. The reproduced writing is a bit small though.
shaithis
Is it the video that mentions > 5% IPC gains? As I don't see mention of it in the article.
Bit out of the loop on this one - will they be doing a socket 1150 version as a dropin replacement for Haswell?
wasabi
Bit out of the loop on this one - will they be doing a socket 1150 version as a dropin replacement for Haswell?

This is the mobile chip at the moment, and is in no way suitable for socket 1150. We've yet to see what Intel will do for desktop, but if it contains the same kinds of changes it'll need a new socket too - the physicality of the new CPU is very different.