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Intel Alder Lake-S unlocked processor prices leak

by Mark Tyson on 3 September 2021, 10:11

Tags: Intel (NASDAQ:INTC)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaeq3d

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We have a pretty good idea about what to expect from Alder Lake-S and the motherboards that will be launched at the same time. However, those most important factors to consumers, pricing and availability, are yet to be set in stone. We have previously heard that PC enthusiasts are going to get their treats first, with performance desktop parts rolling out to kick off the Intel 12th Gen Core processor era. Now some pricing lists from Twitter tech leaker momomo_us seem to confirm this, and we get an early look at prices via this source in Euros, and in USD.

Click to zoom image

Above, you can see what we might expect to pay for the initial salvo of six high-performance Alder Lake-S CPUs from Intel. I've bullet pointed the SKUs and pricing expectations below, so you don't have to peep at the so-so quality screenshots above. In the Euro lists, you will see mention of 'BTW' – this is Dutch VAT.

  • Intel Core i9-12900K (16C/24T): US$706, €736
  • Intel Core i9-12900KF (16C/24T, no iGPU): US$675, €704
  • Intel Core i7-12700K (12C/20T): US$496, €525
  • Intel Core i7-12700KF (12C/20T, no iGPU): US$465, €492
  • Intel Core i5-12600K (10C/16T): US$343, €366
  • Intel Core i5-12600KF (10C/16T, no iGPU): US$313, €334

Commenting upon the Dutch prices, momomo_us said that "it doesn't make much sense". Perhaps he was talking about the complicated looking series of prices, or the scale of the prices. Luckily, the simpler US price list emerged a few hours later. In my bullet point list, please note the US prices won't include sales tax, which varies state to state, but the Euro list includes VAT.

Click to zoom image

So, above are some prices to chew over, while we wait. The most likely release date for the first batch of Intel 12th Gen Core processors as listed above, is on or around 27th October, to coincide with the Intel InnovatiON (Intel ON) three-day event, live-streamed from San Francisco.



HEXUS Forums :: 4 Comments

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Interesting pricing for the first run of big.LITTLE from Intel.

Doesn't look like they're trying to undercut AMD, merely match them at pricing. But will an 8pc/8ec system match/exceed a 5950x? We'll have to see in the reviews.
Tabbykatze
Interesting pricing for the first run of big.LITTLE from Intel.

Doesn't look like they're trying to undercut AMD, merely match them at pricing. But will an 8pc/8ec system match/exceed a 5950x? We'll have to see in the reviews.
I've seen a report (can't find it now) saying the efficiency cores are supposedly around haswell, maybe even skylake, performance but no idea how true that is. If it's true it might be closer than we're expecting.

Personally I'm expecting the 12900k to be competing with the 5900x with 12c/24t rather than the 5950x. It might be the usual AMD wins some, Intel wins some on benchmarks though and it could also change between windows 10 and windows 11 due the scheduler being updated etc.
LSG501
I've seen a report (can't find it now) saying the efficiency cores are supposedly around haswell, maybe even skylake, performance but no idea how true that is. If it's true it might be closer than we're expecting.

Personally I'm expecting the 12900k to be competing with the 5900x with 12c/24t rather than the 5950x. It might be the usual AMD wins some, Intel wins some on benchmarks though and it could also change between windows 10 and windows 11 due the scheduler being updated etc.

I've seen people claiming the same and I did find it on one of Intels slides but it was layered with one of those dubious graph layouts and weird axis scaling.

However, clock for clock, Zen 3 is still over 20% better than a Skylake era core but then again we're looking at efficiency rather than pure grunt.

The other factor to consider is that Skylake era cores performance was normally in SMT configurations and the lost of SMT immediately dropped multi threaded performance by ~30% or so. So on an individual per core basis, they might be equivalent to Skylake/Zen+/Zen 2 but my concern lies in the thread management and multi threaded environment.

Skylake is not a Zen 3 equivalent by any measure, that and Skylake (and subsequent iterations) being competitive with AMD was largely down to pushing more and more boost performance out of the silicon so it can run at higher frequencies for longer in comparison to AMDs processors. So I do not expect the Alder Lake e-cores to be banging the drums out the gate.
These will end up going up against AMD's 5000 series with 3D V-cache enabled. I presume Intel are scrabbling to create versions with an iris cache chip included to try and make some of that back up.