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The Click ARM One is an ARA-like modular tablet

by Mark Tyson on 9 March 2015, 14:05

Tags: Google (NASDAQ:GOOG)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qacpr5

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Spanish company ImasD has unveiled its own take on Google's Project Ara modular concept - but in tablet form. Furthermore ImasD has already started taking pre-orders for the Click ARM One 10-inch modular tablet. This promising ARA-like competitive tablet hopes to appeal to a wider audience by opening up the component design specs of its tablet modules.

The 'ARM' in the slate's name does not have anything to do with the British chipmaker; it simply stands for 'Advanced Removable Modules'. The device's storage, memory and even the display modules will be swappable and the company says it will support open source operating systems including Android, Ubuntu, Tizen and more.

The basic version of the tablet will come with a 'CK Core' module featuring Samsung's Exynos 4412 CPU and 2GB of RAM. The components, including this core, can be easily replaced by other available modules to upgrade or update the Click ARM One's specs. Other components which are designed to be replaceable include the mainboard with HDMI, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and USB, a 16GB storage module, and a 10.1-inch panel with a resolution of 1280x800 pixels.  

The manufacturer has designed the tablet with a traditional desktop PC in mind, where users can decide on the specification of their system without destroying component warranties. Just like Google and PhoneBloks, ImasD is also encouraging third party hardware developers to create modules compatible with the Click ARM One through the mini PCI Express port located on the motherboard. These connectors will open up an array of possibilities in module choices and allow users to connect any existing technology that supports the standards and is compatible with the OS of the device.

ImasD hopes to start shipping the Click ARM One tablet this summer, with pre-orders priced at €289 (£208, US$313). In addition to this limited edition tablet device, with only 1,000 units to be built initially, the firm has partnered with Circular Devices to launch a modular phone called the PuzzlePhone.



HEXUS Forums :: 3 Comments

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The problem is that I care about size and weight, and this is bound to be larger and heavier than a standard tablet. In theory it would be nice to be able to upgrade the CPU or RAM, but I don't expect to see such a tablet that will be appealing enough to me as a tablet.
In addition to this limited edition tablet device, with only 1,000 units to be built initially
And they expect other companies to build modules for it?!
ET3D
The problem is that I care about size and weight, and this is bound to be larger and heavier than a standard tablet. In theory it would be nice to be able to upgrade the CPU or RAM, but I don't expect to see such a tablet that will be appealing enough to me as a tablet.
It'll definitely be thicker than a standard tablet but, being optimistic, perhaps some of that extra thickness can be used to accommodate a larger battery. Personally a little more thickness might not be a bad thing, since that'd make it easier to hold, and undoubtedly more rigid than the current lightweights.

Weight is more of an issue, but I can't see why the limited modularity that ImasD is proposing should add more than a few grams, maybe the weight of one or two AA batteries. And that kind of uplift is not something that is going to bother those, other than the incurably vain, (i.e. “I bought this tablet because it's currently the lightest on the market”). If we want to put a figure on it then I'd say anything below 600g is probably going to be acceptable, (c.f. original iPad is 680g or 730g depending on network capabilities).

I'm less interested in the modular tablet at the moment than the Ara phone, but it's still an interesting direction. Shame that Google couldn't have taken this idea and run with it, as it definitely could do with some big-name support.