vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
Countdown to 2019 and win big with the HEXUS Epic Giveaway [x]
facebook rss twitter

Single atom thick graphene 'light bulb' demonstrated by scientists

by Mark Tyson on 18 June 2015, 15:36

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qacsd7

Add to My Vault: x

Scientists have collaborated to create "what is essentially the world's thinnest light bulb". The development is yet another based upon the pure carbon wonder-material called graphene. Researchers passed current though atom-thin, flexible, transparent strips of graphene which reached temperatures over 2500°C, producing bright light visible to the naked eye.

Behind the new development was a team of scientists from Columbia, Seoul National University (SNU), and Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS). These were led by Young Duck Kim, a postdoctoral research scientist in James Hone’s group at Columbia Engineering.

The new light source development could have a great impact on computing and computer peripherals. First of all these lights are like 'chips', as you can see from the video above, showing how the light emission works. A graphene light chip based upon this development could form the foundation of a photonic circuit. To make such devices possible the team is working on the switching performance of the graphene light chips – it would need to switch very fast to create useful optical communication 'bits'.

A less rigorous possible application of the graphene light chips is in displays, helping manufacturers make better flexible and transparent displays. The researchers expect this kind of application to open up sooner than photonic computing, perhaps in the next five years or so. In testing the scientists discovered the light emitted by the graphene layers was tunable by changing either the substrate or distance between the substrate and graphene layer.

One more application of the new technology could be as miniature hotplates which allow scientists to heat substances to thousands of degrees in a fraction of a second to observe chemical or catalytical reactions.

Interestingly many of the earliest light bulb manufacturers produced carbon filament bulbs, as pictured above, before Tungsten became established as a better material.



HEXUS Forums :: 11 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
Have to say Grahene lightbulbs are hardly news: UoM announced the start of commercial manufacturing back in March: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/article/?id=14206

It's not exactly a big step to go down to single-layer graphene lighting from there. I'm far more interested in the printable grapheme RFID antenna they're working on: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/article/?id=14545

(and in the interest of full disclosure, I do work for UoM, but sadly not in the NGI ;) )
scaryjim
Have to say Grahene lightbulbs are hardly news: UoM announced the start of commercial manufacturing back in March: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/article/?id=14206

It's not exactly a big step to go down to single-layer graphene lighting from there. I'm far more interested in the printable grapheme RFID antenna they're working on: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/article/?id=14545

(and in the interest of full disclosure, I do work for UoM, but sadly not in the NGI ;) )
Unfortunately, that announcement is a whole load of guff with zero technical detail on what the hell they've actually produced.
Incredible
2,500 C. I'm wondering if graphene can be used in heating appliances, and how efficient it would be? It's costly to keep a house warm during the Winter.
Axle_Grease
2,500 C. I'm wondering if graphene can be used in heating appliances, and how efficient it would be? It's costly to keep a house warm during the Winter.

Depends on what you mean by efficiency. A purely resistive load will convert electrical energy into heat energy with 100% efficiency regardless of what the resistor is made from. But higher temperatures mean that more of that heat is radiant energy which may be more desirable for direct heat, while lower temperatures tend to heat by convection, heating the air, which is better for more comfortable background warmth.