vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
facebook rss twitter

Former CEO of Sun states Android didn't need Java license

by Alistair Lowe on 27 April 2012, 10:49

Tags: Google (NASDAQ:GOOG), Sun Microsystems, Oracle (NASDAQ:ORCL)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qabfuj

Add to My Vault: x

Early last week, a legal battle between Google and Oracle over licensing of Java for Android began, with Oracle claiming that Google must licence Java, seeking £630 million in damages.

Oracle began the case with a strong start, offering up e-mail evidence that Android team members had sent out messages and slides confirming that the firm was aware it needed to seek a licence for Android and that initial talks with previous owners of Java, Sun Microsystems, did indeed take place.

Google struck back hard, however, with former Sun CEO, Jonathan Schwartz, taking the stand. When asked the simple and direct question of whether, during his tenure at Sun, were Java APIs were considered propriety or protected by Sun, he simply stated, "No, these are open APIs, and we wanted to bring in more people... we wanted to build the biggest tent and invite as many people as possible."

Schwartz went on to clarify that Sun did initially want a license fee from Google, so that it could join other firms such as Nokia, Motorola and RIM in advertising devices as Java-certified, with support for cross-platform applications, as at the time it was a £65 million business for Sun. However, Google had decided that it needed more control and deviated from a pure Java specification, breaking cross-platform compatibility, however, "We probably would have paid them to work with us on a Java Phone," stated Schwartz, claiming that with revenue as the firm's core focus, spreading Java and moving away from monopolies such as Microsoft was the firm's core aim.

Schwartz admitted that he wished things had happened differently and stated that "We didn't like it, but we weren't going to stop it by complaining about it," going on to say what was most important for the firm was that Google didn't turn to enemy, Microsoft, "Imagine for a moment if Google selected Microsoft Windows," he said, reminding those at the hearing that this was the only real alternative to the Java implementation at that time.

This writer considers, that with such a strong statement and supporting evidence, primarily in the form of blog posts made by Mr Schwartz at the time, Google has successfully turned the tables on Oracle, though, perhaps this isn't how the court will see matters? What do our readers think?



HEXUS Forums :: 6 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
Well at least this makes it clear what a money grabbing exercise this is by oracle. Just hoping for a judge with half a brain…
On the Irony!!!

This web page (the articel) need to install a web component… Java… :)
Hmm, in “splitting hairs” mode I can't help thinking that perhaps Google does perhaps owe Oracle a small amount of money for the use of the (proprietary?) Java API's. That's not the same as needing a full Java license, which is what those greedy beggars in Oracle seem to be angling for.
Personally I would have thought US$100M more than adequate compensation/license for the use of the API's. Unfortunately with the appeals process I suspect that this one will rumble on for years. :(
cheesemp
Well at least this makes it clear what a money grabbing exercise this is by oracle. Just hoping for a judge with half a brain…
Half a brain? Doesn't that make him/her over-qualified to sit in on this kind of case? :D
crossy
Hmm, in “splitting hairs” mode I can't help thinking that perhaps Google does perhaps owe Oracle a small amount of money for the use of the (proprietary?) Java API's.

There's the rub though, Google didn't use Oracle's API's, they developed their own (apart from 9 lines of code that were inadvertently included by a programmer who used to work for SUN).

From what I've read on this case the Judge seems quite clued up on what's going on - the jury on the other hand…
MaddAussie
On the Irony!!!

This web page (the articel) need to install a web component… Java… :)
I noticed that with my laptop earlier. I denied it as I can't stand Java and dont install it at all now. Its plagued with viruses for web viewing and doesn't seem to add anything useful to websites.