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Corsair ONE systems updated to make trio of new ONE Pro PCs

by Mark Tyson on 4 August 2017, 13:01

Tags: Corsair, Intel (NASDAQ:INTC), NVIDIA (NASDAQ:NVDA)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qadkew

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Corsair first teased the Corsair ONE "category defying PC system" back in Feb, then we had one in the HEXUS labs the following month. At the time of release there were four SKUs with some being Corsair webstore exclusives. We concluded that the Corsair ONE was a tidy, compact system well suited to QHD gaming (our review was of the GTX 1080 model) but wished for the extra oomph provided by a fast M.2 SSD.

Now Corsair has updated its range and is offering three versions of its Corsair ONE Pro system with updated specs and capabilities. The new configurations have mostly addressed our review criticisms, making this an even more attractive turnkey PC solution, at a price.

Specifications for new Corsair ONE configurations

 

CORSAIR ONE PRO

CORSAIR ONE PRO

CORSAIR ONE PRO

Chassis

Black, VR Ready

Black, VR Ready

Black, VR Ready

CPU

Intel i7-7700K Liquid Cooled

Intel i7-7700K Liquid Cooled

Intel i7-7700K Liquid Cooled

GPU

NVIDIA GTX 1080 Liquid Cooled

NVIDIA GTX 1080 Ti Liquid Cooled

NVIDIA GTX 1080 Ti Liquid Cooled

DRAM

16GB 2,400MHZ DDR4

16GB 2,400MHZ DDR4

32GB 2,400MHZ DDR4

Storage

480GB m.2 NVMe SSD, 2TB HDD

480GB m.2 NVMe SSD, 2TB HDD

480GB m.2 NVMe SSD, 2TB HDD

Motherboard

Z270

Z270

Z270

PSU

400W SFX, 80 PLUS Gold

500W SFX, 80 PLUS Gold

500W SFX, 80 PLUS Gold

OS

Windows 10 Home

Windows 10 Home

Windows 10 Home

MSRP

$2,299 Exc. TAX / £2,199 inc VAT

$2,699 Exc. TAX / £2,599 inc VAT

$2,899 Exc. TAX / £2,719 inc VAT

 

You can see all the new model configurations above. Some specs remain the same as previous, but the range has benefitted from a subtle but meaningful improvement in some key aspects. Models sporting GeForce GTX 1080 Ti graphics cards are now more easily available. Last time the model packing this card was a Corsair.com exclusive, this time the top spec model is again such an exclusive but the second model down, with the same GPU, isn't.

Previously the highest capacity RAM you could configure was 16GB. Above you can see that you can now buy a Corsair ONE Pro system with 32GB 2,400MHz Venegance LPX DDR4 installed. Storage is more evenly upgraded throughout the range. All systems now come with a 480GB M.2 NVMe SSD and 2TB HDD storage combo but earlier in the year there was a mish-mash of options limited to SATA SSD and HDD combinations.

The compact system retains the unique dual-loop convection cooling, with the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti in the Corsair ONE Pro boosting clock speeds "to 100MHz faster than an equivalent air-cooled GPU, all while running at temperatures close to 30°C cooler". GTX 1080 Ti equipped models get an upgraded 500W PSU.

Corsair says these updated PC systems are immediately available in North America, Europe and Australia from authorised dealers, and direct from the Corsair webstore.



HEXUS Forums :: 6 Comments

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I may be REALLY out of touch here as I've not built a PC for quite some time, partly because I spent a load of cash on a top of the range watercooled beast which still works just fine and is still paying itself back (I bought good but expected it to last and it certainly has done just that) but something really strikes me as odd here…

Please correct me if I'm wrong but don't top of the range GPUs still usually need two power connectors (usually and 6 and an 8 pin) as well as the PCIe bus's power? Doesn't that mean that if they give you a 400W PSU with a 1080Ti and an i7 that you're going to be running very close to the margin? I always bear in mind that is peak power output usually quoted rather than designed sustained power so, whilst I know TDPs have dropped a lot, that seems to be a cop out on a high end system and really limiting upgrading.

Am I this out of date? If I'd have put 400W or even 500W in my system it would have worked fine most of the time for general use but would have likely lost stability at max chooch during gaming, limited my upgrade potential as well as risking shortening the lifespan of the PSU. I'd expect something like this which will be bought by enthusiasts who may well want to upgrade or overclock to have a way bigger PSU - like 750W or something. Am I wrong? Please do tell me if I am as it'll inform my next build.
400W is a bit low for that particular configuration, the 500W is all these need.
philehidiot
Am I this out of date? If I'd have put 400W or even 500W in my system it would have worked fine most of the time for general use but would have likely lost stability at max chooch during gaming, limited my upgrade potential as well as risking shortening the lifespan of the PSU. I'd expect something like this which will be bought by enthusiasts who may well want to upgrade or overclock to have a way bigger PSU - like 750W or something. Am I wrong? Please do tell me if I am as it'll inform my next build.

Personally when building a PC I'll use a PSU calculator which will give a general indication of where you need to be aiming for when buying a PSU. 500W is probably fine for this (I'd guess it would use tops 450W without overclock), but saying that I wouldn't want to overclock anything (do you really need to with the 7700k and 1080Ti?).
philehidiot
I always bear in mind that is peak power output usually quoted rather than designed sustained power so, whilst I know TDPs have dropped a lot, that seems to be a cop out on a high end system and really limiting upgrading.

This is a rather special system, small form factor and water cooled, I don't expect people buying this will want to upgrade beyond plugging in a few USB peripherals.

So within that constraint, Corsair make the PSU they are putting in their system so they should have a really good idea of what it is capable of. I would expect the 400W rating of one of these to be sustained output, not momentary peak like the cheap PSUs quote.

The 1080ti in a 6700K overclocked system draws 330W, so a 500W psu should allow some margin:

The ti systems have a 500W PSU, the 400W is for the plain 1080