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Complete silicon quantum computer chip design unveiled

by Mark Tyson on 18 December 2017, 10:01

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qadoxi

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Engineers based at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) have published a research paper that includes ‘blueprints’ for a quantum computer chip architecture that allows quantum calculations to be performed using existing semiconductor components. “Millions of qubits” can be leveraged in these CMOS designs, say the researchers. Importantly, the designs are claimed to be ready, bar a few expected modifications, for a modern semiconductor manufacturing plant.

We have seen reports of plenty of quantum computer prototype components here in the HEXUS news, in recent years and months. One of the most recent stories concerned the 20 qubit IBM Q System going online, with a 50 qubit model being readied in the background. However, the UNSW research is exciting to hear about, as its spin qubit approach can utilise modern semiconductor manufacturing techniques, and offers impressive scalability.

Scalability

Andrew Dzurak and and Dr Menno Veldhorst published the paper which describes how to use conventional silicon tech to control and read millions of qubits on a single chip. Millions. Remember that this is a blueprint, and the UNSW has only so far taken “baby steps” with the first demonstrations of how to use “conventional silicon transistor switches to 'turn on' operations between qubits in a vast two-dimensional array, using a grid-based 'word' and 'bit' select protocol similar to that used to select bits in a conventional computer memory chip”. Because of the fragility of qubits the UNSW blueprint incorporates a new type of error-correcting code designed specifically for spin qubits.

Before we get the millions of qubit chips mentioned above, there are several scientific and manufacturing hurdles yet to be negotiated, said to be “a hell of a challenge… but the groundwork is there”. TheUNSW team have taken on a contract to develop a 10-qubit prototype silicon quantum integrated circuit by 2022. It is this component which will be central to building the world's first quantum computer in silicon, reports Phys.org.



HEXUS Forums :: 6 Comments

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“10-qubit prototype silicon quantum integrated circuit by 2022.”



I know this is going to go down like a lead balloon with a lot of people but surely there goes the majority of blockchain encryption and hence crypto? At least it's a few years out. Maybe more than 10 qubits will be needed. But I'm calling it here just being cautious.

Thanks for the news Hexus.
Millennium
“10-qubit prototype silicon quantum integrated circuit by 2022.”

I know this is going to go down like a lead balloon with a lot of people but surely there goes the majority of blockchain encryption and hence crypto? At least it's a few years out. Maybe more than 10 qubits will be needed. But I'm calling it here just being cautious.

Thanks for the news Hexus.

I was thinking the exact same thing last week when considering why people are throwing money at crypto. Once just one of these systems comes online and demonstrates even a fraction of its potential then cryptocurrency as we know it will plummet. They may have to switch into quantum level encryption security but you need specialised infrastructure to make that work and so far I think only China has this laid down and only in a limited fashion for its military.
Millennium
I know this is going to go down like a lead balloon with a lot of people but surely there goes the majority of blockchain encryption and hence crypto? At least it's a few years out. Maybe more than 10 qubits will be needed. But I'm calling it here just being cautious.

There are some crypto currencies that have been designed with this in mind, for example Quantum Resistant Ledger. In the grand scheme of things though, crypto is still quite small.

More worrying is public key cryptography in general - current SSL/TLS standards are vulnerable to quantum algorithms. All internet banking/internet shopping/VPNs and general online activity being insecure is a much larger worry than cryptocurrencies!
Bagnaj97
There are some crypto currencies that have been designed with this in mind, for example Quantum Resistant Ledger. In the grand scheme of things though, crypto is still quite small.

More worrying is public key cryptography in general - current SSL/TLS standards are vulnerable to quantum algorithms. All internet banking/internet shopping/VPNs and general online activity being insecure is a much larger worry than cryptocurrencies!

yeah, but we've still got 10 years to enjoy win7 then before we'll all have to start using something newer. Plenty of time enough to learn linux.
And this is only what has been published…