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AMD details Ryzen Threadripper pricing, availability and specs

by Parm Mann on 31 July 2017, 03:30

Tags: AMD (NYSE:AMD)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qadj45

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AMD's high-end desktop (HEDT) Ryzen Threadripper processors are now available for pre-order ahead of retail availability starting August 10.

The enthusiast additions to the Ryzen range extend the reach of the Zen architecture from $109 for the Ryzen 3 1200 right the way up to $999 courtesy of the new Ryzen Threadripper 1950X. AMD's range-topping part has been on the cards for some time, as has the second-rung Ryzen Threadripper 1920X, and the manufacturer is now revealing some of the finer details including TDP and cache size, as well as confirmation of a third HEDT chip, the $549 Ryzen Threadripper 1900X, due August 31.

Introduced as high-power solutions for developers, content creators and mega-tasking gamers, the trio of Threadripper CPUs makes use of the new TR4 package and, as expected, carry a 180W TDP.

AMD Ryzen from top to bottom

Model
Cores / Threads
TDP
L3 Cache
Base Clock
Turbo Clock
XFR
DDR4 Support
Package
Price
AMD Ryzen Threadripper
Ryzen Threadripper 1950X
16 / 32
180W
32MB
3.4GHz
4.0GHz
TBC
Quad 2666
TR4
$999
Ryzen Threadripper 1920X
12 / 24
180W
32MB
3.5GHz
4.0GHz
TBC
Quad 2666
TR4
$799
Ryzen Threadripper 1900X
8 / 16
180W
16MB
3.8GHz
4.0GHz
TBC
Quad 2666
TR4
$549
AMD Ryzen 7
Ryzen 7 1800X
8 / 16
95W
16MB
3.6GHz
4.0GHz
100MHz
Dual 2666
AM4
$499
Ryzen 7 1700X
8 / 16
95W
16MB
3.4GHz
3.8GHz
100MHz
Dual 2666
AM4
$399
Ryzen 7 1700
8 / 16
65W
16MB
3.0GHz
3.7GHz
50MHz
Dual 2666
AM4
$329
AMD Ryzen 5
Ryzen 5 1600X
6 / 12
95W
16MB
3.6GHz
4.0GHz
100MHz
Dual 2666
AM4
$249
Ryzen 5 1600
6 / 12
65W
16MB
3.2GHz
3.6GHz
100MHz
Dual 2666
AM4
$219
Ryzen 5 1500X
4 / 8
65W
16MB
3.5GHz
3.7GHz
200MHz
Dual 2666
AM4
$189
Ryzen 5 1400
4 / 8
65W
8MB
3.2GHz
3.4GHz
50MHz
Dual 2666
AM4
$169
AMD Ryzen 3
Ryzen 3 1300X
4 / 4
65W
8MB
3.5GHz
3.7GHz
200MHz
Dual 2666
AM4
$129
Ryzen 3 1200
4 / 4
65W
8MB
3.1GHz
3.4GHz
50MHz
Dual 2666
AM4
$109

AMD's CPU product range has been transformed in the space of just five months and now features a dozen models encompassing every conceivable usage scenario. At the top of the stack, Ryzen Threadripper aims to restore innovation and excitement to the HEDT marketplace by offering more cores, threads, cache and PCIe lanes than the closest Intel alternative, at a lower or equivalent price point.

The arrival of Ryzen Threadripper 1950X and 1920X as the world's first 16- and 12-core desktop consumer processors reaffirms AMD's resurgence in the CPU arena, and a full ecosystem of supporting X399 motherboards is expected at launch. Compatible air and liquid coolers will be available from popular brands such as Corsair, Noctua and Cooler Master, and AMD has also confirmed that an adapter will be included in the Threadripper retail package to enable compatibility with a selection of existing Asetek-based all-in-one liquid coolers.

Turbo clock, unsurprisingly, is on par with the existing Ryzen 7 1800X at 4.0GHz, though AMD isn't yet ready to divulge details regarding Threadripper's XFR headroom which, going by other parts in the Ryzen range, could afford an extra 200MHz with a suitable cooler in place.

HEDT: AMD Ryzen Threadripper vs. Intel Core

Model
Cores / Threads
L3 Cache
Base Clock
Turbo Clock
Turbo Boost 3.0
XFR
PCIe
3.0
Lanes
Memory
Channels
TDP
Package
Price
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X
16 / 32
32MB
3.4GHz
4.0GHz
-
TBC
64
Quad
180W
TR4
$999
Intel Core i9-7900X
10 / 20
13.75MB
3.3GHz
4.3GHz
4.5GHz
-
44
Quad
140W
2066
$999
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920X
12 / 24
32MB
3.5GHz
4.0GHz
TBC
64
Quad
180W
TR4
$799
Intel Core i7-7820X
8 / 16
11MB
3.6GHz
4.3GHz
4.5GHz
-
28
Quad
140W
2066
$599
AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X
8 / 16
16MB
3.8GHz
4.0GHz
TBC
64
Quad
180W
TR4
$549
Intel Core i7-7800X
6 / 12
8.25MB
3.5GHz
4.0GHz
-
-
28
Quad
140W
2066
$389

On paper, the Threadripper specification appears dominant alongside Intel's recently announced Core X Series range. With half-a-dozen extra cores, Threadripper 1950X claims to be 38 per cent quicker in Cinebench than the Core i9-7900X available at the same price point, though Intel's superior IPC performance will continue to give Core X processors an advantage in single-thread workloads.

Performance and power consumption will be scrutinised in great detail in the coming weeks, yet what really sets Ryzen Threadripper apart from the competition is the available feature set. Whereas Intel has historically chosen to deactivate certain processor capabilities for anything other than the range-topping part, AMD has ensured that all Ryzen Threadripper CPUs are multiplier unlocked and able to offer a full compliment of 64 PCIe lanes.

Plenty of cause for optimism, yet Threadripper's multi-die approach to CPU design does result in a few interesting characteristics. Details on how the chip combats latency to deals with particular workloads will be revealed in the weeks ahead, and we're intrigued to see how Threadripper fares with real-world workloads. Our benchmarks are about to begin in earnest, so check back on August 10 for the definitive HEXUS review.



HEXUS Forums :: 25 Comments

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About time AMD could pick and choose the price it charges for processors like Intel has been able to for years…
The jump from Ryzen 7 1800X to Ryzen Threadripper 1900X doesn't give you more cores/threads, but a .2 GHz boost on clock speed across all cores and a TDP change from 95W to 180W! No surprise they didn't pick that processor for the performance-per-watt chart.
Quad DDR4 support and 64 pcie lanes is a huge jump from the lower end parts though. Not aimed at the lower wattage requiring customers, but a 40 watt jump from Intel is quite a bit. Real world figures I'd expect to be lower but as discussed in many places Threadripper is a multi-die chip and so could always be expected to have a higher TDP
From the Ryzen price cut thread:

scaryjim
Making pricing room so the low end threadripper CPUs can come in ~ $499, perhaps?

;)

OK, so I was $50 on the low side, but really no surprise to see an 8 core TR in the mix - as 3dcandy says the platform gains are a huge jump, and I'm intrigued to see that, rather than drop the TDP, they've used the 180W design point the platform's built for to push the clocks up to the ragged edge. They could've made a 130W part but they've chosen to make sure the processor is never slower than an 1800X - that's potentially a very good move…
WAIT!!! the 16 core AMD drinks less electricity from the wall compared to the 7900x under max load??? For real.