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Asus goes extreme with ROG X299 and X399 mobos

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Zenith Extreme and Rampage VI Extreme lead the way for AMD and Intel chipsets.

Asus has gone to town on high-end consumer motherboards. We say this because the company has loaded the proverbial kitchen sink on its premier AMD and Intel offerings.

Starting off with AMD, Asus is one of the few guys to produce the X399 chipset reserved for the upcoming 'Threadripper' CPU. The Zenith Extreme features premium components all round - integrated OLED screen, Aura Sync lighting, 802.11ad WiFi, RGB strips, and 10Gbe Ethernet - and should be available as soon as Threadripper launches in the summer.

Arguably, the X299 Rampage VI Extreme is even more out there, but we won't spoil the surprises until you watch Jonathan from Asus give you the rundown in the video above. Tempted by either ultra-premium platforms?

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HEXUS Forums :: 6 Comments

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ThreadRipper and X399 make Ryzen 7 and X370 look a bit low end mainstream now. The PCIe V3.0 lane count is the killer feature and it is going to be NVMe that chews it up. Fair enough the gaming and graphics enthusiasts will be lapping up the dual and perhaps triple x16 V3.0 potential but the slowest part of any PC / Workstation will always be the storage and with ThreadRipper we can potentially start thinking about hitting 10Gb/s in the very near future without the need for a crazily expensive HBA or RAID cards. 2 x Samsung 960 Pros in RAID 0 will be hitting 5Gbs, what will 4 give us? :) - Throw in quad channel to keep the beast fed from a memory perspective and it is beginning to feel like the late 90's and early 00's when the CPU's and platforms were getting some real design and innovation. AMD has completely caught Intel offside with their pricing / PCIe lane restrictions.
I was looking at getting a Ryzen 7 + an Asus Sabertooth X370 but now will save a bit more and wait till Oct and build myself a monster 16C, 64GB Ram, 2TB Nvme, 18TB HDD, Vega, watercool the lot and then load up Win 10 Pro, Centos 7 and for giggles OS/2 in its latest Arca Noae 5.0 (Blue Lion) guise.
robbiec
ThreadRipper and X399 make Ryzen 7 and X370 look a bit low end mainstream now.

Just cos something newer came along does not mean that the other thing becomes useless. How many can really harness the horsepower of the latest and greatest tech thing to truly justify owning it? Is it a need or a want? Your life will be really miserable if you fail to understand this…
preter_s
Just cos something newer came along does not mean that the other thing becomes useless. How many can really harness the horsepower of the latest and greatest tech thing to truly justify owning it? Is it a need or a want? Your life will be really miserable if you fail to understand this…

I did not say nor intend it to mean that it becomes useless, merely adding a bit of context to what I believe ThreadRipper does to Ryzen 7 market placement.

For the next part of your statement, perhaps you should take some of your own advice that you are freely wishing to dole out and mind your own business of what I wish to want to buy with my own hard earned cash. I build a new machine for my own use every 5 years or so which then might have one or two incremental updates applied before the next new build. If you check my forum profile you will see I am still using an AMD FX8350 and an AMD R9 290 which I have had a great deal of value and use from. I thoroughly dislike the business practices that Intel has used over the years and where possible will support AMD in a personal capacity. My usage profile will be for development - Powershell, Cobol and VB, running multiple systems currently (Win 10 and a Centos 7), digital workflow and when I get the chance a bit of light gaming with titles such as Elite Dangerous and IL2 Sturmovik.

S!
robbiec
preter_s
Just cos something newer came along does not mean that the other thing becomes useless. How many can really harness the horsepower of the latest and greatest tech thing to truly justify owning it? Is it a need or a want? Your life will be really miserable if you fail to understand this…

I did not say nor intend it to mean that it becomes useless, merely adding a bit of context to what I believe ThreadRipper does to Ryzen 7 market placement.

For the next part of your statement, perhaps you should take some of your own advice that you are freely wishing to dole out and mind your own business of what I wish to want to buy with my own hard earned cash. I build a new machine for my own use every 5 years or so which then might have one or two incremental updates applied before the next new build. If you check my forum profile you will see I am still using an AMD FX8350 and an AMD R9 290 which I have had a great deal of value and use from. I thoroughly dislike the business practices that Intel has used over the years and where possible will support AMD in a personal capacity. My usage profile will be for development - Powershell, Cobol and VB, running multiple systems currently (Win 10 and a Centos 7), digital workflow and when I get the chance a bit of light gaming with titles such as Elite Dangerous and IL2 Sturmovik.

S!


Just as I thought… a cry baby… oooh something better came along, what I had specced is no longer good enough event though my use case hasn't changed much. Look at your own idiotic statemnts “… look a bit low end mainstream now.” Ryzen 7 was never low end … duh… cry baby.
preter_s
Just as I thought… a cry baby… oooh something better came along, what I had specced is no longer good enough event though my use case hasn't changed much. Look at your own idiotic statemnts “… look a bit low end mainstream now.” Ryzen 7 was never low end … duh… cry baby.
Might wanna drop that 'tude, dude… Attack the argument, not the poster.