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Review: Razer Blade Stealth

by Tarinder Sandhu on 8 November 2016, 16:01

Tags: Razer, Intel (NASDAQ:INTC)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qadao3

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Conclusion

...Razer is certainly on the right track with the Blade Stealth.

The Razer Blade Stealth offers an intriguing prospect to the well-heeled gamer who wants a light, capable ultrabook for the day and aa gaming machine by night.

Razer gets the ultrabook part mostly right. Slim, well built and now featuring solid on-the-go life from a larger-capacity battery, this machine features a very good touchscreen that's only compromised by being overly reflective and, subjectively, with bezels that take away from the overall aesthetic.

The companion Core enclosure connects to the Stealth via Thunderbolt 3. Easy as pie to connect but potentially compromised by the lack of performance from the Core chip, it's a well-executed concept that is perhaps better suited to the more powerful, bigger Blade laptops.

Razer is certainly on the right track with the Blade Stealth. A couple of tweaks - an edge-to-edge display, for example - would take it from good to great.

The Good
 
The Bad
Sleek, attractive design
Thin, light and highly portable
Core adds potential
Fast NVMe M.2 SSD
 
Bezel is large and noticeable
CPU not powerful enough for Core



Razer Blade Stealth

HEXUS.where2buy

The Razer Blade Stealth is available to buy from the Razer Store.

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At HEXUS, we invite the companies whose products we test to comment on our articles. If any company representatives for the products reviewed choose to respond, we'll publish their commentary here verbatim.



HEXUS Forums :: 9 Comments

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I want a new laptop this christmas and I keep getting drawn to this. I like the looks of it but I cant help feeling the dell xps 13 or the hp spectre's both seem like better offerings..
I think you made a mistake, you accidentally said the Core unit is £500 on its own, and that CANNOT be bloody true

Also, I don't think the CPU complaint is valid. You can't really complain that a 15w laptop CPU isn't as powerful as a 65w desktop equivilent
Tunnah
I think you made a mistake, you accidentally said the Core unit is £500 on its own, and that CANNOT be bloody true

Also, I don't think the CPU complaint is valid. You can't really complain that a 15w laptop CPU isn't as powerful as a 65w desktop equivilent

£400 effectively assuming you buy them together. Does seem steep for an external GPU enclosure, even if it's the first of its' kind?

I think the point is that the processing power demands of the Core place more of a strain than is viable for this level of processor, whether or not it's the top of the range.

This is a pretty neat idea. Any idea whether the Core is compatible with other thunderbolt-equipped machines?
Tunnah
I think you made a mistake, you accidentally said the Core unit is £500 on its own, and that CANNOT be bloody true

Also, I don't think the CPU complaint is valid. You can't really complain that a 15w laptop CPU isn't as powerful as a 65w desktop equivilent

There are laptops with proper desktop CPUs in them. Very costly, but when I buy a laptop I'm definitely getting one of those and not a standard laptop CPU.
The reduction in performance with the core is due to thunderbolt 3's low bandwidth compared to PCIe 3.0, if you hook the core itself up to an external monitor it should do a bit better also.