vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
facebook rss twitter

Microsoft says Windows 7 isn't fit for modern hardware and security

by Mark Tyson on 17 January 2017, 11:01

Tags: Microsoft (NASDAQ:MSFT), Windows 10, Windows 7

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qaddfa

Add to My Vault: x

Mainstream support for Windows 7 ended in January 2015 and the OS is in its five year period of extended support, receiving only security fixes (ends 14th January 2020). However that really isn't good enough for businesses and enterprises which value modern technology and security, says Markus Nitschke, head of Windows at Microsoft Germany, in a new Microsoft TechNet blog post (German).

Windows customers should take a look at the lessons learnt from the transition from Windows XP, asserts Nitschke. Organisations should transition in good time, otherwise their sensitive data will be faced by "enormous dangers" over the next three years and any transition period. Over half of all German companies have been cyber attack victims but cutting edge Windows 10 security features can help prevent such victimhood, Nitschke said.

An example of the higher security offered by Windows 10 is in its modern "machine-learning post-breach solution that detects behavioural patterns" in malware. Windows Information Protection is another key feature of Windows 10 that should appeal to the security conscious. Access control via Windows Hello and secure biometric logging to the computer via fingerprint, facial or iris recognition helps keep systems safe from unauthorised persons. Furthermore the Windows 10 Creators Update will bring additional enhanced intelligent security and efficient administrative functions this spring.

Considering modernity, Windows 10 is necessary for full support of some modern processors and I/O. The newest Intel processors, upcoming AMD Ryzen chips, and Qualcomm Cellular PCs are only fully supported by Windows 10. Chipset features such as power management and modern I/O standards like USB 3 and Thunderbolt can also prove problematic to those using older OSes.

The move from Windows 7 to 10 should be less problematic than from Windows XP to 7 for those who wish to update. Windows XP seemed to have many badly behaved apps that stumbled on newer OSes but Microsoft and its partner hardware and software developers appear to have worked to stricter standards from Windows 7 onwards.



HEXUS Forums :: 71 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
If there's not enough pull to get people to Windows 10, and you keep pushing them away from Windows 7 then maybe they'll look for another option…
jimbouk
If there's not enough pull to get people to Windows 10, and you keep pushing them away from Windows 7 then maybe they'll look for another option…

I would not want to be the head of IT for an SMB fully implementing something else, if not because it would be harder to do so (and maintain) then because of the hassle of teaching others how to use it.

I won't argue that W10 has flaws, but to me it feels like a well rounded OS, and once your admins have gotten around to disabling as much of its standard bloat software as possible…
Ozaron
I would not want to be the head of IT for an SMB fully implementing something else, if not because it would be harder to do so (and maintain) then because of the hassle of teaching others how to use it.

I won't argue that W10 has flaws, but to me it feels like a well rounded OS, and once your admins have gotten around to disabling as much of its standard bloat software as possible…

Indeed. Most large companies use builds that remove the bloat and nail everything to the floor. From my experience in IT many are already planning the move. I can't see many moving to “alternatives” that's for sure.

For personal users Windows 10 is pretty strong now and it's still improving. Windows 7 was a great OS and I used it for a long time, but I fully understand MSFT wanting to get people off it and to support 1 less OS.

What's the choice in the personal space ? LINUX for techies and Mac's for Yuppies. Both of those have their fans and if you are the target audience for either you probably use them already.
jimbouk
If there's not enough pull to get people to Windows 10, and you keep pushing them away from Windows 7 then maybe they'll look for another option…

I fully encourage them to do so. I'm honestly tired of people incessantly whinging on about Windows 10 and how much they wouldn't touch it with a bargepole (for frankly questionable reasons). I wish my employer would hurry up with their Windows 10 rollout - I'm a developer and Windows 7 is starting to cause me serious headaches.
I'm still rolling out XP :)