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EVGA releases the Epower V standalone 12+2 VRM board

by Mark Tyson on 19 September 2017, 12:31

Tags: EVGA

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qadlu5

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EVGA has written to HEXUS to tell us about its new standalone VRM board. The new EVGA Epower V is a standalone 12+2 VRM board designed to provide additional power to target devices such as graphics cards or motherboards. With an EVGA Epower V in your PC system you will benefit from two fully-independent voltage outputs with EVBot MKII facilitating on-the-fly voltage control. It's an accessory targeting those aiming to squeeze the very peak of performance from their PCs.

You will connect the Epower V via 3x 6-pin PCI-E power connectors. This input is fed through a 12+2 phase design "to provide substantially more VCORE and VMEM to your graphics card, allowing it to break through any limits holding it back," explains EVGA's email.

Usefully, the Epower V has its own onboard VCORE and VMEM LED Display. You can quickly and easily check this LED display which adjusts in real-time. EVGA has integrated its EVBOT MKII buttons to conveniently adjust your voltages on the fly, or upgrade your firmware and connect your EVBot to control the graphics card remotely. For greater flexibility you can connect to the board via the board's USB 3.1 Type-C port software control (also used for firmware updates).

Other key features of the EVGA Epower V include the following:

  • VMEM - Voltage adjustment range 600mV to 2300mV. Rated capacity is 80A. Maximum peak capacity - 90A at 1.9V output voltage.
  • VCORE - Voltage adjustment range is 600mV to 2000mV. Rated capacity is 600A. Maximum peak capacity - 620A at 1.85V output voltage.
  • Infineon IR latest generation digital PWM
  • Droop, Force, and Offset Voltage Switches - To further customize your EPOWER V, use the available DIP switches to use remote sense to control for VDROOP, Force your overclock voltages, and/or Offset your voltages for the ultimate in stability choices.
  • ProbeIT - ProbeIT connectors are among the easiest ways to hook up a device to a multimeter to painlessly read voltages on-demand to give you the most accurate readings whenever you need them.
  • Fan Headers - The EPOWER V board brings the voltage, and gives you easy access to fan connectors so you can also keep it cool. Use one or two 12v fans to keep your system rock solid during even your longest benching sessions.
  • 1 Year, DOA Warranty (no exceptions)

Using this board for overclocking your GPU, for example, isn't a trivial process. EVGA partner KingPin has written a detailed guide to implementing this stand-alone power board which involves removing onboard VRM inductors on the graphics card and soldering the Epower V to the graphics card, among other things. Explanatory circuit diagrams are available.

The EVGA Epower V is available now in the US and in Europe, priced at $249 and €269.99 (inc VAT) respectively.



HEXUS Forums :: 5 Comments

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how much ? XD
Well anyway, not in the market for such a thing
This strikes me as tech that could develop its idea and implementation in time, the current pricing seems expensive and I'm not a fan of soldering expensive parts, maybe a future GPU and future VRM expansion could be designed to fit together easier.

This has got me thinking though… imagine some kind of modular motherboard where you could switch out the CPU socket, VRM section or expansion slots etc. so you could upgrade parts of the board yourself whether it be for better overclocking or newer components. Now I know the issue of compatibility would be an uphill climb, and there will always be tech that throws everything out of the water and you would need to replace it all eventually, but if the boards, CPU and chipset were all designed with this in mind, then perhaps a socket replacement or two before needing a new board could be made possible in the future? It would make investing in a top end board far more attractive for many.
Isn't it easier to invest those money in a better quality gpu or motherboard?
GinoLatino
Isn't it easier to invest those money in a better quality gpu or motherboard?

Yes, but this is only for hardcore overclockers - they aren't interested in just performance, but in pushing hardware to extreme limits. This is never going anywhere near mainstream or enthusiast markets.
chinf
GinoLatino
Isn't it easier to invest those money in a better quality gpu or motherboard?

Yes, but this is only for hardcore overclockers - they aren't interested in just performance, but in pushing hardware to extreme limits. This is never going anywhere near mainstream or enthusiast markets.

As a complete product I would agree, but there is always the possibility of some ideas or execution of them filtering down.
It happens with high-end mainstream products, so this can potentially benefit the rest of us in time.