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Enermax pits latest ETS-T40Fit cooler against a 350W coffee pot

by Mark Tyson on 25 August 2015, 14:31

Tags: Enermax (8093.TWO)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qactzw

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PC components maker Enermax, a specialist in the production of PSUs, chassis, CPU coolers and fans, has today launched the new ETS-T40Fit range of CPU air coolers. The range is designed and rated for cooling the vast majority of Intel and AMD CPUs in use today, cooling processors rated up to 200W TDP. However, to dramatically demonstrate the ETS-T40Fit cooling ability Enermax decided to pit one of the space saving devices against a 350W electric espresso coffee maker.

In a 26°C air conditioned room the filled espresso maker boils the water contained in about nine minutes. Under the same conditions Enermax boffins attempted to boil the espresso maker with a ETS-T40Fit perched on top, it got close to 99°C during the tests but never boiled. I think it could have performed even better if its heatpipes could somehow be submerged in the water. The test, which used one of Enermax's new air coolers with its fan running at 1800RPM, ran for over an hour and a half. By that time the boffins probably wanted another cup of coffee, so gave up.

The new product range

Enermax launched the original ETS-T40 CPU cooler series four years ago and is now replacing them with the ETS-T40Fit cooler range. The 'Fit' suffix is there to highlight the slim (41mm) heatsink construction. Enermax claims that this slim design minimises the chance of obstructing DIMM slots, even with a second optional fan fitted in ITX to ATX based systems.

Several technologies work in unison to provide the cool and quiet performance. Enermax claims that its Vacuum Effect Flow enhances the air flow, while the Vortex Generator Flow optimizes the cooling of the heat pipes bringing the air close to the heatpipes. Plus don't forget Enermax's Heat Pipe Direct Touch technology.

There are three models in the ETS-T40Fit cooler range. The ETS-T40F-TB uses a 12cm twisted bearing T.B.Silence fan PWM controlled from 800 – 1,800 RPM. The ETS-T40F-BK 'Black Twister' employs a 12x blue LED fan TB Apollish PWM 12cm fan as its cooling power plant. Lastly, and possibly best for those particularly sensitive to background noise, the ETS-T40F-RF employs a new 14-cm-winglet fan (no LEDs on this model).

The ETS-T40F-TB and ETS-T40F-RF coolers can be made even quieter with the addition of an optional RPM Adapter, stepping down the operational frequencies. Meanwhile the LED equipped ETS-T40F-BK has a black high-tech coating "for most effective heat dissipation".

The new ETS-T40Fit cooler range is compatible with Intel 775/1150 /1151/1155 /1156/1366/ 2011/2011-3 and AMD AM2/AM2+ /AM3/AM3+ /FM1/FM2/FM2+ based systems. Buyers receive a tube of high-quality Dow Corning thermal grease (TC-5121).

Enermax wrote to HEXUS saying that the three new coolers are available immediately, priced at MSRP incl. VAT: 37.90 Euro for ETS-T40F-TB, 40.90 Euro for the ETS-T40F-RF and 44.90 Euro for the ETS-T40F-BK.



HEXUS Forums :: 14 Comments

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The test, which used one of Enermax's new air coolers with its fan running at 1800RPM, ran for over an hour and a half. By that time the boffins probably wanted another cup of coffee, so gave up.
Love it. :D

I'm not 100% sold on the scientific value of the test reaching 99% but never quite boiling, in the context of a CPU cooler, but it's quite a clever marketing stunt.
Well this sounds like a pretty good cooler, and it sounds like they are gunning for the 212 EVO around that price point, with the added selling point of specifically avoiding blocking the DIMM slots where possible.

That said, we'll have to wait for proper benchmarks to see how it compares, but if it performs equally, takes up less space and is easier to fit the the 212 Initiation ritual, I can see myself using them in future.
If water boils at 100ºC and this thing dropped temperatures to 99ºC… that doesn't sound very impressive.

That means my 75ºC CPU at full tilt will be, what… 74ºC?
Ttaskmaster
If water boils at 100ºC and this thing dropped temperatures to 99ºC… that doesn't sound very impressive.

That means my 75ºC CPU at full tilt will be, what… 74ºC?

Point is it was cooling and preventing a 350 watt appliance from boiling water - so roughly getting rid of said 350 watts easily. As the kettle NEVER boiled it's probably actually getting rid of 360 watts given the margin of errors you'd see
Ttaskmaster
If water boils at 100ºC and this thing dropped temperatures to 99ºC… that doesn't sound very impressive.

That means my 75ºC CPU at full tilt will be, what… 74ºC?
No, that means you skipped physics classes at school.