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Akasa Euler ST is the first fanless chassis for Intel Mini-STX boards

by Mark Tyson on 17 February 2016, 10:31

Tags: Akasa, Intel (NASDAQ:INTC)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qacyos

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Back at CES 2016 last month we saw the first motherboards built to Intel's Mini-STX specification. These were previously known as 5x5 motherboards (due to the dimensions) and are like NUC sized boards that allow for swappable processors via an LGA socket. Both ASRock and ECS had such boards offering support for processors up to 65W TDPs. At the time only Silverstone had a yet unnamed and unpriced chassis purpose-made for Mini-STX.

Now, thanks to exclusive information from FanlessTech, we can have a look at a Mini-STX chassis in the pipeline from Akasa. Not only would this be one of the first such chassis available, it is also a fanless model. You can see it pictured above.

Akasa's Euler ST looks like many of its other compact fanless designs, with a black anodised all-aluminium construction. You can see that the chassis itself, with its ridged design, acts as a cooler for the CPU you fit. Right now the Akasa Euler ST isn't detailed in Akasa's product pages, but you can see many similarly constructed chassis for mini-ITX or NUC motherboards. Very similar products to this new Akasa Euler ST are the Akasa Newton range of NUC chassis; they all use a similar compact chassis and are VESA mountable.

With its compact fanless design the maximum TDP processor supported by the Akasa Euler ST is expected to be 35W. More details and further specifications of the Euler ST are expected soon.



HEXUS Forums :: 7 Comments

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I like the idea of these but I can only think they're aimed as businesses that have limited space. And if the cost is the same as an AIO then I expect thats the route they'll go.
the concept of minimalism is good yet it did sacrifice the opportunity to water cool
PooKer
I like the idea of these but I can only think they're aimed as businesses that have limited space. And if the cost is the same as an AIO then I expect thats the route they'll go.

Not really as Akasa won't have the level of support or management tools that businesses need.
I have an almost identical case for my NUC from Akasa, very effective at removing heat from the i3. The build quality is very good but mine gets quite warm after prolonged use with high bit rate video (I use it as HTPC) so wonder how well it will do with larger TDP CPUs
mocksy13
the concept of minimalism is good yet it did sacrifice the opportunity to water cool
Why do you need to watercool processors with less than 15w TDP ?