vacancies advertise contact news tip The Vault
EPIC Competition in the run up to 2015 - win something everyday! [x]
facebook rss twitter

HP beats Apple in reliability survey

by Pete Mason on 19 January 2011, 16:42

Tags: ASUSTeK (TPE:2357), Toshiba (TYO:6502), Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL), Lenovo, Hewlett Packard (NYSE:HPQ)

Quick Link: HEXUS.net/qa34c

Add to My Vault: x

PC service and repair firm Rescuecom has announced that HP has been ranked number one in its annual reliability report, bumping perennial champion Apple off the top spot.

Based on the number of calls that the firm received to its call centre and the manufacturer's PC market share in the US, Rescuecom is able to come up with a score that it claims is representative of out-of-warranty reliability.

HP - and subsidiary Compaq - received a score of 346, based on a market share of 25 per cent and a call share of 7.2 per cent. This was almost double runners up Apple and Lenovo's scores of 179 and 177, respectively. Rounding out the top five were 2009 champion ASUS with 144 and Toshiba with 96. Dell, which has a similar market share to HP, failed to make its way into the top five.

Manufacturer U.S. Computer Market Share  RESCUECOM Computer Repair Shares  Computer Reliability Score 
HP/COMPAQ 25.0% 7.2% 346
APPLE 8.8% 4.9% 179
IBM/LENOVO 4.8% 2.7% 177
ASUS 3.5% 2.4% 144
TOSHIBA 8.4% 8.8% 96

These results are only unusual because HP is normally ranked fairly low on reliability and has been stuck in fifth place in this table for the past few years. Apple, on the other hand, usually leads by quite a significant margin. It's also interesting that ASUS shot from relative obscurity to take the second place in last years chart, only to slip back a bit this year.

Of course, the numbers themselves should be taken with a pinch of salt. The survey assumes that the 20,000 support calls surveyed - and Rescuecom's wider customer base - accurately represent the market share in the wider US and that the reasons for the calls are problems with the systems, not just user errors.



HEXUS Forums :: 11 Comments

Login with Forum Account

Don't have an account? Register today!
Don't even talk to me about reliability when almost all makers still have unrepaired laptops with faulty nvidia GPUs. Every single customer should have been either offered a replacement or a free out of warranty repair (regardless of whether you kept the receipt or if you have the "right" model).
Regardless of if you've been offered it, you should still be entitled to a repair - even if you're out of warranty - due to it being a widespread problem and therefore a manufacturer defect rather than user mistreatment and the like. Although my consumer law is a little rusty, never having studied it ;)
Your right, Sales of good act right? not fit for purpose...something along them lines, either way i dont care my laptop with its ATI gpu is running sweet XD
I've used the sale of goods act here in the UK to great success but it doesn't apply if you bought the equipment abroad. Also not sure where you stand as a consumer if you don't have a proof of purchase.

My advice to anyone who asks me is to only go for integrated graphics in laptops.
Whilst there is a bit of horses for courses, the thing is I can't help but feel this research might be skewed.

People like HP and Lenovo are big business players, now most people treat something that is directly their own better, than something which is their employers, silly as this is because many employers work out the 'total cost' of an employing including the renewal cost of IT kit they directly consume.

But my point is if its a businesses purchase it may well get trashed faster, everyone here knows that an Apple anything or most VAIOs will not take a pounding the way a lenovo will, or anything in the same league as a toughbook. Whilst the latter is only used by specialists plenty of lenovos seem to be thought of as if they were a toughbook.

As such I'd have to say props to HP for been low cost + high durability, but is this just beacause their retail share has been increasing due to deminished demand in business sectors?